User Tag List

Risultati da 1 a 9 di 9

Discussione: Il bunker Greenbrier

  1. #1
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Il bunker Greenbrier

    Solo un bunker antiatomico della "guerra fredda" o anche un luogo per incontri in "stile Bilderberg" forse più occulti ?

    Nel 1992 sul Washingtonpost appariva questo articolo che rivelava l'esistenza di un bunker costruito sotto un ala dell' hotel Greenbrier in Virginia

    washingtonpost.com: THE ULTIMATE CONGRESSIONAL HIDEAWAY

    •   Alt 

      TP Advertising

      advertising

       

  2. #2
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier

    Il testo dell'articolo in originale:

    The Ultimate Congressional Hideaway

    By Ted Gup
    Sunday, May 31, 1992; Page W11
    The Washington Post

    The year was 1960 and Randy Wickline was building something so immense and unnerving that he dared not ask what it was. All the Superior Supply Co. plant manager was told was that he was to haul concrete -- an endless river of concrete -- to be poured into the cavernous hole that had been excavated beside the posh Greenbrier hotel in White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. He remembers an urgency about the job, his supervisor hollering "hurry up," even instructing him to push the legal weight limit on his truckloads, and paying the fines that resulted. To keep up with the job, Superior Supply had to purchase two more concrete mixers, and still it was stretched thin. Over the next 2 1/2 years, Wickline estimates, the company hauled some 4,000 loads to the site and poured 50,000 tons of concrete into the abyss that scrapers, rippers and air hammers had carved out of the shale. Cost was never an issue.
    A warren of rooms and corridors took shape where there had been a hill. The walls were two feet thick and reinforced with steel. Later, the entire structure was covered with a concrete roof and buried beneath 20 feet of dirt. At each entrance, cranes hung humongous steel doors, as if giants were to inhabit the underground structure. Soon thereafter, Wickline was told, "sensitive equipment" was moved into the facility. The door was locked. A guard was posted outside. No one had to tell Wickline that what he had helped build had something to do with the atomic bomb. "Nobody came out and said it was a bomb shelter," he says today, "but you could pretty well look and see the way they was setting it up there that they wasn't building it to keep the rain off of them. I mean a fool would have known. There would have been enough room to get a few dignitaries in there, but us poor folks would be left standing outside. It kind of made me think about it -- and hope it never happens."
    For years, the work that Wickline and scores of other local builders undertook at the Greenbrier fueled speculation, but in time the memories dimmed and the rumors died. History took its course, and the generation that was defined by its anxiety over the Bomb began to see hope for a future free of mushroom clouds and radiation sickness.
    But inside the hill, time stood still.
    Now, more than three decades later, interviews with numerous current and former hotel employees and executives, contractors and former government officials, along with a review of private blueprints, drawings and photographs, have confirmed Randy Wickline's assumption, and more. What he helped build, it is now clear, was a haven for members of the U.S. Congress in the event of a nuclear war.
    Unlike other government relocation centers, built mainly to house military and executive branch officials who would manage a nuclear crisis and its aftermath, the Greenbrier facility was custom-designed to meet the needs of a Congress-in-hiding, complete with a chamber for the Senate, a chamber for the House and a massive hall for joint sessions. Its discovery offers the first conclusive evidence that Congress as a whole was even included in government evacuation scenarios and given a role in postwar America. Today, the installation still stands at the ready, its operators still working under cover at the hotel -- a concrete-and-steel monument to the nuclear nightmare. The secrecy that has surrounded the site has shielded it both from public scrutiny and official reassessment, and may have allowed it to outlive the purpose for which it was conceived.
    House Speaker Thomas Foley, one of the very few in Congress who has been briefed on the Greenbrier facility, declined to comment for this article. But former speaker Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill says the evacuation plan always seemed "far-fetched" to him. "I never mentioned it to anybody," O'Neill recalls. "But every time I went down to the Greenbrier -- and I went there half a dozen times -- I always used to look at the hill and say, 'Well, that's where we're supposed to live in the event something happens, and that's where we're going to do business, maybe under the tennis courts.' "
    Situated in a lush and remote valley in the Allegheny Mountains five hours' drive southwest of Washington, the Greenbrier is one of the nation's premier resorts, a place that touts itself as a playground for foreign princes and America's political elite. Twenty-three men who were or would become U.S. presidents have stayed there. Dinners are six courses. The most elaborate are set with 24-karat-gold vermeil and served by waiters in forest green livery. A fleet of bottle-green stretch limos idles in front of the columned portico. Spread over 6,500 manicured acres, complete with golf courses, skeet shooting, spas and a stream stocked with rainbow trout, the Greenbrier wants to be seen as a resort of distinction and aristocratic carriage. It is designated a National Historic Landmark -- and seems among the last places one might expect to find a Strangelovian bunker.
    Though the resort has knowingly hosted both the ultra-sensitive congressional hideaway and the people who maintain it, there seems to have been little concern that any of the Greenbrier's 1,600 employees would reveal the facility's existence. Many have heard rumors about what lies beneath the vast extension known as the West Virginia Wing, which houses luxury rooms and a complete medical clinic. Some have direct knowledge of the installation, but no one will talk openly about it. The Greenbrier is the only significant private employer in hardscrabble Greenbrier County, and its workers -- many of whom are second- and third-generation employees -- don't have to be reminded of the strictness with which the resort manages its public image. "Anyone who doesn't work here and who is of working age, there's a reason they're not here," says the hotel's president, Ted Kleisner. "Everyone comes to work for life here. People die. People retire. And a couple of people get fired each year. That's it."
    Even before the facility was built, the Greenbrier and the U.S. government were no strangers. In the winter of 1941-42, the hotel served as a U.S. internment facility for Japanese, Italian and German diplomats. On September 1, 1942, the U.S. Army commandeered the entire resort -- purchasing it for $3.3 million from its owner, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad -- then converted it into a 2,200-bed military hospital. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was twice a patient there. (He returned to celebrate a wedding anniversary in 1945.) After the war, the rail- road bought the resort back. Other governmental links followed. In 1949, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson met at the Greenbrier with the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the secretaries of the Army, Air Force and Navy for what a history of the Greenbrier called a "top-secret discussion of postwar military strategy." In 1956 Eisenhower hosted an international conference there with the leaders of Canada and Mexico. Hotel operators at the time answered the phone: "Good morning, Greenbrier White House." The hotel has three connecting "Eisenhower Parlors," and Ike's bust is on display in the North Parlor.
    There have also been frequent congressional visits over the years -- in the 1980s, Democrats from Congress liked to meet there -- and senior officials from every recent administration have been to the resort. A 1991 promotional publication features a photo of Greenbrier President Kleisner welcoming Secretary of Defense Richard Cheney.
    Despite its many government ties, there is a touch of irony in the Greenbrier's selection as host for a facility built in response to the Soviet threat. Cyrus Eaton, the man who presided over the C&O -- now the conglomerate CSX -- enjoyed a cozy relationship with the Soviet leadership. Dubbed "the Kremlin's favorite capitalist," he took pride in having received the Lenin Peace Prize, and in 1954 organized a meeting between U.S. and Soviet atomic scientists in the hope they would warn their respective leaders of the perils of the arms race.
    "What got me started was the atomic bomb and the realization that our civilization and theirs could be wiped out overnight," he once said.
    When construction on the facility began in 1959, near the end of the second Eisenhower administration, the Cold War was at its height and fear of a Soviet nuclear attack was deeply embedded both in the psyche of ordinary citizens and in the thoughts of Pentagon planners. Americans were excavating back yards for bomb shelters, storing cans of Campbell's soup on basement shelves and screening "duck-and-cover" films for schoolchildren. Meanwhile, the government was building a number of relocation centers on the East Coast. Most were carved out of mountains and became alternate command posts for the president and Cabinet, or communications centers (see box, Page 14). It was the heyday of the doomsday planners. "Continuity of government," as it came to be called, evolved into a military subspecialty. Near Berrille, Va., Mount Weather was hollowed out of solid rock and filled with state-of-the-art communications equipment, underground reservoirs and banks of computers. Another such facility was located at Raven Rock Mountain in Pennsylvania near Fort Ritchie.
    The Greenbrier was different in that it relied more on the element of secrecy than on any mountain of rock to shield it from incoming bombs. Yet despite the discretion of the resort staff, the existence of some kind of hidden government installation there was widely known. One former government official says he was told that so many people in the White Sulphur Springs area knew about the facility that the government dispatched two men who had not been briefed on the project to mingle with the locals, posing as hunters, to learn just how much was known and what was being said. According to the official, the two returned to Washington a few days later with so many details about the facility that they had to be given top-secret clearance.
    Hundreds of people suspect that something hush-hush lies under the Greenbrier's West Virginia Wing. "I've always heard the rumors that there is some kind of bomb shelter under the Greenbrier's clinic," says County Assessor Clyde Bowling. Like many in this small town of 2,800, he remembers being told that a company called Forsythe Associates operated the bomb shelter, and that a man named "Fritz" Bugas ran Forsythe.
    For many others, the facility is less a matter of suspicion than a certainty. "The government does have an installation there, no question about it," says John Bowling, a former mayor of White Sulphur Springs. "It's common knowledge here." John Bowling says he has known for years that the facility is a government relocation center. His family, long in the hardware business, sold many of the parts that went into the construction of the West Virginia Wing. His uncle, Bowling says, had an empty skating rink where the government stored C-rations before transferring them to the site. He remembers the concrete walls, two feet thick. "The depth of the excavation was very, very impressive," he says. "It was way down there."
    At the time the facility was being built, White Sulphur Springs Police Chief Bernard Morgan recalls, he was told by the head of Greenbrier security, the late Harry Welsh, that without a security clearance he would not be allowed inside. Gerald A. Wylie, a Greenbrier security officer from 1963 until 1980, says he has been in the facility; unwilling to comment further, he says only that "it makes you feel safe." Martha Dixon is the widow of Arnold Dixon, who worked as an engineer at the Greenbrier. She recalls her husband telling her that he had to enter the facility periodically to test the generators there. "It was all supposed to be very secretive," he told her. "It was for the ones in Washington to come here."
    Another former Greenbrier security officer, who asked not to be identified, says he saw bunk beds, shower rooms, an internal power plant and numerous offices behind the secured door leading to the facility. He also recalls seeing a vast number of crates of C-rations. "You could last a long time in there," he says. "If war had broken out, we {Greenbrier security} would have taken charge." An office inside the facility was designated for the use of security officers, he says.
    Not surprisingly, most of the Greenbrier's current and former managers deny the existence of any hidden facility beneath the resort. The company line comes from CSX spokesman James A. Searle Jr. in Richmond: "There's no bomb shelter, no government facility. I can tell you what I know is the truth and that is the end of it."
    Chuck Ingalsbee was the Greenbrier's general manager from December 1984 until February 1987. He now runs a Caribbean resort on the island of Anguilla. Asked about the existence of a classified government facility under the West Virginia Wing, he said he would have to "touch base with a couple of people" before he could answer. "I won't speak to the issue until I have had a conversation with the right people," he said. "It was an official oath I gave." In a subsequent conversation a week later, Ingalsbee said he had been directed not to speak about the facility.
    Truman Wright, now retired and living in Highland Beach, Fla., ran the Greenbrier from 1951 until 1974, spanning the period in which the facility was constructed. "I did not know for certain of anything that was going into it," he recalls. "I purposely did not look into it." Wright acknowledges knowing there was a government installation there. "I didn't imagine it was for hotel guests," he says. But while "I was supposed to be as knowledgeable as anyone . . . anything that took place took place at a level far higher than mine, for example in the Terminal Tower Building in Cleveland {then C&O corporate headquarters}. I don't know what went on. I simply worked for the railroad."
    During the construction of the West Virginia Wing, Wright recalls, he had a conversation with a contractor about one cavernous room he was working on. "This is an exhibit hall?" observed the puzzled contractor. "We've got 110 urinals we just installed. What in the hell are you going to exhibit?"
    Wright says he was kept in the dark about the installation's funding as well. Told of another source's belief that in return for allowing the facility to be built at the Greenbrier, the government helped pay to construct the West Virginia Wing, Wright says it is plausible but he has no firsthand knowledge of the new wing's finances.
    From the beginning, the Greenbrier relocation center has been run by Forsythe Associates, an obscure company ostensibly based in Arlington. Standing at the ready to operate the facility, whose entrance is only steps away from one of its Greenbrier offices, Forsythe has a cover that shows a genius for simplicity. The company's six or seven full-time employees emphatically deny any involvement with the government. They say that their job is to repair and service the Greenbrier's nearly 1,000 television sets and provide the hotel with television service.
    It is true that Forsythe Associates' employees repair TVs and deliver cable programming to the hotel's guests. And it may be true that some of the company's employees know little or nothing about the classified site. But there have been plenty of signs that the company is not simply what it appears to be.
    The first general manager of Forsythe's Greenbrier operation was John Londis, now 76 and retired to Boca Raton, Fla. Londis is a former cryptographic expert with the Army Signal Corps who had a top-secret security clearance and was stationed at the Pentagon. He arrived at the Greenbrier in 1960 as work on the installation was getting under way. During the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, according to one former government official, Londis made a point of leaving work on schedule so as not to attract attention, but then returned to the facility under cover of darkness. In a recent interview, Londis denied any knowledge of a hidden installation and said his only work was to provide television service to the hotel.
    A series of recent calls to the Forsythe office in Arlington was greeted with this recording: "You have reached Forsythe Associates. Currently we are unable to come to the phone. Please leave your name and number and we will return your call as soon as possible . . . beep . . . beep . . . beep . . . The tape is full; please call again." A week later the tape was replaced, but no calls were ever returned.
    Forsythe maintains a complex of antennas, ostensibly used to deliver cable programs, atop a nearby mountain. A former government official who visited the site says that one of the antennas had a tube-like sensor designed to detect the brilliant light emitted in a nuclear flash. That sensor, he said, would trigger an alarm within the underground facility. The company has at least two offices at the Greenbrier, one a maintenance shop for technicians and supplies, the other an administrative building in an area seldom frequented by resort guests. The front door of the administrative office has three separate locking mechanisms -- a Dayton time-lock on the inside, and, on the outside, a Yale lock and a magnetic key-card lock. Inside are the offices of Paul E. "Fritz" Bugas, who replaced John Londis when he retired in 1976.
    Bugas is a short man with a salt-and-pepper beard, a dark hairpiece, thick glasses and an outgoing personality. A friend who asked not to be named says that, like Londis, Bugas was a career officer in the Army Signal Corps with a top-secret security clearance. His title is eastern regional director of Forsythe, though Forsythe employees say they know of no Forsythe business other than that at the Greenbrier. On his desk, behind his nameplate, is a small American flag with gold braid. On the bookshelf behind his desk is an eclectic collection of books including such titles as Robert Scheer's With Enough Shovels: Reagan, Bush and Nuclear War and Stanley Karnow's Vietnam: A History. In a brief phone conversation Bugas said, "I don't have any qualms about talking with you." He promised to call back, but never did.
    Bugas's assistant is a man named John Nemcik, who says he worked as an Air Force radio operator and had a top-secret clearance until he retired in 1958. In 1977, he says, he came to Forsythe's Greenbrier office after learning of a vacancy. How he learned of the vacancy he does not remember. Prior to that, he says, he worked for an Ohio firm from 1975 to 1977. Asked what he did in the 17 years between military service and the Ohio position, he says, "I bounced around at odd jobs."
    Across the hall from Bugas's office is that of his temporary secretary, Gladys Childers. The office contains a word processor, a printer and, in the corner, a high-speed shredder. Why does a television repair firm need a shredder? "That's to get rid of Gladys's mistakes," says Nemcik with a laugh.
    Details of the desing and construction of the facility, of course, are scarce. But Randy Wickline, who hauled concrete to the site, remembers seeing the name "Mosler" on the enormous doors that were installed at the entrances.
    "Mosler" was Mosler Safe Co., an Ohio-based manufacturer famed for its vaults and safes. In the '50s and early '60s it also had a flourishing "nuclear products group" that used the company's expertise to build massive doors for government relocation centers and bunkers. The company believed its doors could survive the impact of an atomic bomb blast, or at least a near miss. A Mosler vault door withstood a nuclear blast some two-fifths of a mile away at the government's Nevada Test Site in 1957.
    Chuck Oder, still an engineer with Mosler, helped build the blast-proof doors for the Greenbrier. His project records note that he received an order for four specially built doors in February 1960. The entry simply read "Greenbrier Hotel." But in the project jacket and archives of the company there is a wealth of information about Mosler's contribution to the project. Beside the specifications on one set of blueprints is written: "Greenbrier Hotel: White Sulphur Springs Additional Facilities."
    Two of the four doors ordered were gigantic, built to shield vehicular entrances. One was designated "GH 1," the other, "GH 3." With its frame and assembly, GH 1 weighed more than 28 tons and measured 12 feet 3 inches wide and 15 feet high. The other vehicular door, GH 3, weighed more than 20 tons. The doors were 19 1/2 inches thick. Each was hung with two hinges. Those hinges alone weighed 1 1/2 tons, according to Mosler's records. Yet the doors were so delicately balanced that they could be opened and closed with the application of a mere 50 pounds of force against their bulk. Two other doors were also built: a hatch-like door measuring 3 feet by 3 1/2 feet, and a "personnel door" 7 feet wide by 8 feet high.
    Ordinarily, the larger doors would have been constructed with two panels, or "leafs," but the Greenbrier doors were "single leaf." Single-leaf construction maximized the doors' strength, eliminating the vulnerability caused by a seam. Engineering instructions from the time note: "The locking devices shall be operable from the inside only and shall be protected against any possible damage by blast action against the outside surface of the doors." In keeping with those instructions, large wheel handles were fitted on the inside of the two larger doors.
    Placing the handle on the inside served two functions. First, it enabled those inside the facility to lock themselves in against those who might otherwise try to enter. Most importantly, as the instructions note, it protected the locking mechanism from a blast. Turning the handle one way slid giant pins or rollers into fittings behind the frame. Turning the wheel the other way released the pins. Not surprisingly, the whole apparatus resembled the workings of a safe -- but instead of deterring robbers, it was meant to withstand an atomic explosion. A bomb's initial impact would theoretically be absorbed by the door, then spread to the frame, then finally to the wall of concrete poured around the frame. The door would bend inward under the strain, distorted and bowed. Then would come the reactionary pressure after the blast. The door would recoil -- or, as the experts say, "rebound" -- shooting outward. Without the huge pins to secure it, the door might fly off its hinges on the rebound.
    From Mosler's Hamilton, Ohio, plant, the doors were moved to West Virginia by train. They were too wide to be laid flat on an ordinary freight car, so they had to be transported standing or tilted at an angle, requiring a special flatbed car that was low enough so the doors would clear tunnels and trestles on the way. Notations on Mosler's blueprints indicate that upon arrival at the Greenbrier, the steel doors were to be filled with concrete. Mosler personnel at the job site installed the doors and their frames.
    Not having been inside the hidden portions of the Greenbrier facility, I cannot paint an exact, up-to-date picture of what lies beyond those Mosler doors. But a former government official whose familiarity with the facility dates back to its origins offers a fairly complete description, many details of which are confirmed by sources stationed there in more recent years.
    The relocation center's largest room is not hidden, but has been incorporated into the design of the resort's West Virginia Wing and is known as "The Exhibit Hall." Measuring 89 by 186 feet beneath a ceiling nearly 20 feet high and lined with 18 massive support columns, it is one of the hotel's major conference facilities. Through a vehicular entrance, exhibitors can drive truckloads of equipment and displays into the hall. General Motors' top executives have met here amid displays of the company's newest model cars. A Greenbrier brochure dating from the early 1960s notes, "The floor is finished with a beautiful plastic terrazzo designed to support unlimited weight."
    Both the vehicular entrance and a second, pedestrian entrance can be sealed off by blast doors on very short notice. Yet hotel guests see nothing but a spacious room. On a recent afternoon, guests were practicing their golf drives there, hitting balls into large cages made of nets, while off-duty resort employees jogged around the perimeter. Children played shuffleboard along the north wall.
    At the rear of the Exhibit Hall are two smaller auditoriums also available for guest use. The larger of these seats about 470 -- enough to accommodate the 435-member House of Representatives. Green corduroy-covered chairs with armrests that raise up to become desks are locked into rows. A red carpet leads to the stage. The smaller of the auditoriums has a seating capacity of about 130, enough to serve as a temporary Senate chamber. The Exhibit Hall itself could be used for joint sessions of Congress.
    All of this has been open and available to hundreds of thousands of unsuspecting guests who have passed through for more than three decades. But the rest of the installation is out of public view.
    Not far from the auditoriums is a large white door with four metal bolts; two lock into the floor and two into the ceiling. It leads to a corridor, perhaps 20 yards long, that ends at a locked door where a sign with red letters against a white background cautions: "Danger: High Voltage Keep Out." Overhead are a large emergency lighting system, vents and what appear to be sensors. Few people have been beyond this door, which can be opened only with a special key card.
    When the former government official first entered the facility, he was amazed by what he saw. Along the left side of the wide corridor leading further into the hillside was an infirmary complete with an operating table, then a dormitory with hundreds of metal bunk beds. The mattresses were covered, but the beds were not made. Beside the dormitory was a shower room, complete with wrapped bars of soap in the dishes. "I remember the first time I saw it, especially the dormitory," the former official says. "I had bad dreams that night. It's one of those experiences you don't lightly forget. It scared the hell out of me."
    Beyond that room was a television studio from which the legislators would be able to address what was left of the nation. Still further into the compound was a radio and communications room, then a room with phone booths that had been specially soundproofed and fitted with cryptographic machines. To the right of the corridor as one entered the door was a dining room where a number of place settings had been neatly laid out. The walls of the dining room featured false windows complete with wooden frames and country scenes painted on them. The idea, apparently, was that the illusion of being above ground might counter the sense of entombment that could come from a prolonged stay in the facility.
    There was also a kitchen and storage area. In the very rear of the compound was a power room, with two diesel generators, standing two stories high, ready to supply all electrical needs. In the same room was a device identified as a "pathological waste incinerator" (translation: an oven for cremations). Once the blast doors were sealed, no one could enter or leave until the crisis had passed. Burial or other disposal of bodies would be impossible, the former official was told.
    Beyond the installation, a vehicular tunnel led through the hill and out to the rear of the Greenbrier property, invisible from the road, but convenient to both Route 60 and a railroad line. Supplies for the facility came in through this tunnel, usually at night.
    Ted Kleisner, president and managing director of the Greenbrier, is a gracious host. Photos in the hotel's brochures show him beaming with his celebrity guests. But he can hardly be expected to welcome questions about a government installation concealed within his resort.
    "How could that possibly go on without my total involvement?" he says as he prepares to fly to Vancouver to pick up an American Automobile Association Five Diamond Award, the resort's umpteenth honor for excellence. "It can't. I run everything that's here at the Greenbrier. . . . Our only role here is to serve guests."
    Kleisner consents to accompany me to the West Virginia Wing to prove once and for all that there is no secret site on the property. From his office it is a 10-minute walk through one lavish salon after another, and finally down a long, stark connecting corridor reminiscent of a Pentagon hallway. On the way he dismisses the story I'm reporting as "bizarre," "fantastic" and utterly untrue.
    As we approach the Exhibit Hall I point out a false wall behind which one of the blast doors is concealed. Five large steel hinges protrude from the wall. He laughs and says I'm looking at "an expansion joint" connecting the two buildings.
    We make our way to the rear of the 470-seat auditorium. Imagining the House of Representatives in session here, the outside doors to the Exhibit Hall sealed behind tons of steel and concrete, I try to conjure up the agenda: Retaliation? Rebuilding the nation? Kleisner interrupts my eerie reverie to note that this is where the children of employees watch cartoons at Christmastime.
    Finally we stand a few feet from the door that leads directly to the hidden part of the relocation facility. It is the only closed door I have asked to go through. Kleisner refuses to open it. "Actually that goes to an equipment area and we just don't need to go back there," he explains. Later I ask him again why I could not enter the door. "Because I said 'no,' " he says firmly.
    As he prepares to leave for Vancouver, his tone softens. The nation "ought to have a facility like what you say we have here," he says. "We ought to have lots of facilities to protect us in case Moammar Gadhafi decides to throw a few over our bow." Well, I ask, why not at the Greenbrier? "It clearly would not be compatible with a destination resort," he says.
    Then, in case his repeated denials have missed their mark, he invokes the absurd. "Do you honestly think that if there was imminent global nuclear war that Congress would be sipping tea and listening to concerts at the Greenbrier?"
    When it comes to the usefulness of the Greenbrier facility, Kleisner's question may be uncomfortably close to the mark.
    Just how Congress was expected to reach the Greenbrier is unclear. It is at least a five-hour drive from the Capitol. In the spring of 1962, just as the facility became operational, the C&O and the Greenbrier paid some $90,000 to have the runway at the nearby Greenbrier Valley Airport extended, according to a promotional brochure of the time. Today that airport has a 7,000-foot runway capable of handling a commercial jetliner. But it is still an hour's flight from Washington. And because very few members of Congress have been aware that the facility exists, it would take far longer than that to round them up.
    The installation only made sense if the planners anticipated evacuating Congress many hours, if not days, before a crisis turned from rhetoric to attack. Yet mobilizing 535 members of Congress and evacuating them to a resort area 250 miles away in the middle of such a crisis would almost certainly draw unwanted attention to the site.
    Another problem is that members of Congress would be barred from bringing their spouses or children. Tip O'Neill recalls that, as speaker, he received an annual briefing on the facility, but says he didn't pay much attention to it. "I kind of lost interest in it when they told me my wife would not be going with me," O'Neill says. "I said, 'Jesus, you don't think I'm going to run away and leave my wife? That's the craziest thing I ever heard of.' " O'Neill's concerns have been repeatedly echoed by Cabinet secretaries and other top officials during mock exercises at other relocation centers. Only a few have expressed a willingness to leave Washington -- ground zero in almost every attack scenario -- without their families.
    All these factors made the utility of the Greenbrier facility questionable from the beginning. In the decades since it was conceived and built, the number of nuclear weapons has vastly multiplied and their accuracy has been greatly enhanced. And the time elapsed from launch to impact could be less than 15 minutes. "I never put much credence in it, to tell you the truth," O'Neill says. "I just didn't think it would work."
    No exodus from Congress has ever been attempted, so the practicality of the relocation plan has never been put to the test. On at least one occasion, however -- during the Cuban missile crisis -- the Greenbrier facility was put on high alert. One former official recalls being told of a series of crates arriving at the Greenbrier during that period, sent from Washington by the architect of the Capitol. Inside, the official was told, were original manuscripts dating back to the 18th century, part of an apparent effort to disperse critical government documents so that they would not all be incinerated in a nuclear conflagration.
    Absurdity in doomsday scenarios is relative, however, and the Greenbrier plan looks good in comparison with the government's relocation plans for ordinary citizens. As recently as June 1990, for example, the nation's civil defense planners still designated Greenbrier County as the place to which some 45,500 residents of Fairfax County would be evacuated in the event of a nuclear war, under a master plan to relocate civilian populations living in key East Coast target areas. It is a ludicrous plan, as some of those charged with overseeing it freely acknowledge. "They would be running from nowhere to nowhere -- to me, it would be absolute panic," says C. Kim Hallam Jr., a "population protection planning officer" with the West Virginia Office of Emergency Services. "To be honest, I usually have a pretty good imagination, but if I lived in Fairfax County, I can't see myself driving five hours to some place where there's not going to be anything to help me once I got there."
    The sudden influx of people would more than double the county's population. Not only is there no vast and well-stocked underground bunker waiting to take them in, there is no food or shelter set aside for them at all. Instead they would be expected to show up with recreational vehicles or tents and to bring their own food, medicine and supplies.
    "They would be located in hills and valleys and pasture lands," says Rudy Holbrook, the civil defense coordinator for Greenbrier County. "It would be tent city."
    I was 11 at the time of the Cuban missile crisis. I remember believing that I would not grow up to be a man. I remember crouching under my desk at school and being told to face away from the window when the blast hit. I remember too the jet-black newspaper headlines that each day suggested we were moving closer to the precipice, the grainy photos with arrows pointing to long objects on the decks of Soviet ships. I wondered why I'd been born into the first generation that had to grow up in the shadow of the Bomb. Even as a child, perhaps especially as a child, it seemed unfair.
    More than 30 years after the complex was dug beside the Greenbrier, I walk the hill that hides it and search for evidence of the facility. The pine and oak trees that have taken root since then are now mature. The ground is cushioned with decaying pine needles, and deer droppings are scattered everywhere. I find some comfort in this, the passage of time. I draw an easier breath thinking that over the course of three decades, all that lies beneath my feet in the forbidden bunker -- all the horrific plans and preparations -- has remained unneeded. Walking this ground as a man of 41 helps me to come to terms with those childhood nightmares.
    At the summit of the hill, a green and ghostly T-shaped smokestack rises out of the ground. Behind a fence, a large satellite dish points toward a cloudless sky. I wend my way over the hill, through entangling thickets. Thorns and briers snag my pants legs. A hare darts out from behind a tree. Eventually I come to a clearing and a road that leads to the rear entrance of the installation. I know that behind the bright metal facade, flanked by concrete walls, is one of the blast doors built by Mosler.
    And it strikes me that here, before my eyes, is the very architecture of fear. The Greenbrier's secret lesson is the same one my generation learned so well: how to compartmentalize our lives. How to contain our fear just below the surface, secure and controlled -- daily denying its existence -- while above ground we manicured our lawns, concentrated on recreation and consumption, and turned up the music as loud as it would go. So too it has been with the Greenbrier. For 30 years, its guests have come to play golf, to be massaged, to bathe in the restorative waters of the mineral baths, while some of the men who repaired their televisions and brought them movies made all things ready for a darker world after this world.
    Ted Gup is a Washington correspondent for Time. His last article for the Magazine was on fugitive financier Tom Billman.
    © Copyright The Washington Post Company

  3. #3
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier

    (trad automatica)

    The Hideaway ultimo Congresso

    Con Ted Gup
    Domenica 31 MAGGIO 1992; Pagina W11
    The Washington Post

    L'anno era il 1960 e Randy Wickline stava costruendo qualcosa di così immenso e snervante che non osava chiedere cosa fosse. Tutto il Superiore di alimentazione direttore dello stabilimento Co. è stato detto era che doveva trasportare cemento - un fiume infinito di calcestruzzo - da versare nel foro cavernoso che era stata scavata accanto all'hotel Greenbrier elegante a White Sulphur Springs, W. Va . Ricorda l'urgenza per il lavoro, il suo supervisore gridando "in fretta", anche che gli diceva di spingere il limite legale di peso sui suoi camion, e pagare le multe che hanno portato. Per stare al passo con il lavoro, alimentazione superiore dovuto acquistare due mixer più concreti, e ancora è stato allungato sottile. Nel corso dei prossimi 2 1/2 anni, le stime Wickline, l'azienda trasportato circa 4000 carichi al sito e versato 50.000 tonnellate di cemento nel baratro che martella raschietti, rippers e l'aria si era scavato nella scisto. Il costo non è mai stato un problema.
    Un dedalo di stanze e corridoi in cui ha preso forma c'era stata una collina. Le pareti erano due metri di spessore e rinforzato in acciaio. Più tardi, l'intera struttura è stata coperta con un tetto di cemento e sepolto sotto 20 metri di terra. Ad ogni ingresso, porte in acciaio appeso gru gigantesche, come se fossero giganti di abitare la struttura sotterranea. Poco dopo, Wickline è stato detto, "materiale sensibile" è stato spostato nella struttura. La porta era chiusa a chiave. Una guardia è stato pubblicato al di fuori. Nessuno doveva dire Wickline che quello che aveva contribuito a costruire qualcosa a che fare con la bomba atomica. "Nessuno è venuto fuori e ha detto che era un rifugio antiaereo", dice oggi, "ma si potrebbe abbastanza bene guardare e vedere il modo in cui è stata la creazione di là che non è vero costruzione per mantenere la pioggia fuori di essi. I .. dire un pazzo avrebbe saputo Non ci sarebbe stato spazio sufficiente per ottenere un paio di dignitari in là, ma noi povera gente sarebbe rimasta in piedi al di fuori E 'sorta di mi ha fatto pensare a questo proposito - e spero che non accada mai ".
    Per anni, il lavoro che Wickline e decine di altri costruttori locali impegnati a Greenbrier alimentato l'ipotesi, ma nel tempo i ricordi in grigio e le voci sono morti. La storia ha preso il suo corso, e la generazione che è stata definita dalla sua ansia per la bomba ha cominciato a vedere la speranza per un futuro privo di funghi atomici e radiazioni.
    Ma dentro la collina, il tempo si fermò.
    Ora, più di tre decenni dopo, interviste a numerosi dipendenti dell'hotel attuali ed ex e dirigenti, imprenditori e funzionari del governo precedente, insieme ad una revisione di progetti privati, disegni e fotografie, hanno confermato ipotesi Randy Wickline, e altro ancora. Quello che ha contribuito a costruire, è ormai chiaro, era un rifugio per i membri del Congresso degli Stati Uniti nel caso di una guerra nucleare.
    A differenza di altri centri di delocalizzazione del governo, costruiti principalmente ai funzionari filiali delle case militari e dirigente che avrebbe gestire una crisi nucleare e le sue conseguenze, la struttura Greenbrier è stato progettato su misura per soddisfare le esigenze di un Congresso-in-nascosto, completo di una camera per il Senato, una camera per la Casa e una sala enorme per le sessioni congiunte. La sua scoperta offre la prima prova conclusiva che il Congresso nel suo complesso è stato anche inserito in scenari di evacuazione del governo e dato un ruolo nel dopoguerra America. Oggi, l'installazione si trova ancora a portata di mano, i suoi gestori ancora lavorando sotto copertura in hotel - un monumento in cemento e acciaio per l'incubo nucleare. La segretezza che ha circondato il sito è protetto che sia dal controllo pubblico e riesame ufficiale, e potrebbe aver permesso di sopravvivere lo scopo per il quale è stato concepito.
    Presidente della Camera Thomas Foley, uno dei pochi al Congresso che è stato informato per l'impianto Greenbrier, ha rifiutato di commentare per questo articolo. Ma l'ex speaker Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill dice il piano di evacuazione è sempre sembrato "inverosimile" a lui. "Non l'ho mai detto a nessuno," O'Neill ricorda. "Ma ogni volta che andavo giù al Greenbrier - e ci sono andato una mezza dozzina di volte - ho sempre usato per guardare la collina e dire: 'Bene, è lì che noi dovremmo vivere in caso succede qualcosa, ed è lì che stiamo andando a fare affari, magari sotto i campi da tennis. ' "
    S ituato in una valle lussureggiante e remoto in auto a sud ovest delle Montagne Allegheny cinque ore di Washington, il Greenbrier è una delle località più importanti del paese, un luogo che si pubblicizza come un parco giochi per i principi stranieri e d'elite politico americano. Ventitre uomini che erano o sarebbero diventati presidenti degli Stati Uniti sono rimasti lì. Cene sono sei corsi. Il più elaborato è impostato con 24 carati in oro vermeil e servita da camerieri in livrea verde foresta. Una flotta di verde bottiglia inattivo tratto limousine di fronte al portico a colonne. Si sviluppa su 6500 ettari curati, completo di campi da golf, tiro al piattello, terme e un flusso fornito con la trota iridea, il Greenbrier vuole essere visto come un resort di distinzione e di trasporto aristocratica. E 'designato un monumento storico nazionale - e sembra tra gli ultimi posti ci si potrebbe aspettare di trovare un bunker Strangelovian.
    Sebbene il resort ha consapevolmente ospitato sia l'ultra-sensibile rifugio del Congresso e le persone che lo sostengono, sembra che ci sia stata la preoccupazione sul fatto che uno dei Greenbrier di 1.600 dipendenti avrebbe rivelato l'esistenza della struttura. Molti hanno sentito voci su cosa c'è sotto la vasta estensione nota come Virginia West Wing, che ospita camere di lusso e una clinica medica completa. Alcuni hanno conoscenza diretta dell'installazione, ma nessuno parlerà apertamente. The Greenbrier è l'unica importante datore di lavoro privato in hardscrabble Greenbrier County, e dei suoi lavoratori - molti dei quali sono dipendenti di seconda e terza generazione - non devono essere ricordato il rigore con cui il villaggio gestisce la sua immagine pubblica. "Chi non lavora e chi è in età lavorativa, c'è una ragione per cui non sono qui", dice il presidente della struttura, Ted Kleisner. "Tutti vengono a lavorare per tutta la vita qui. Gente muore. Persone in pensione. E un paio di persone licenziato ogni anno. Questo è tutto."
    Ancor prima che l'impianto è stato costruito, il Greenbrier e il governo degli Stati Uniti non erano estranei. Nell'inverno del 1941-42, l'hotel servito da un impianto di internamento degli Stati Uniti per diplomatici giapponesi, italiano e tedesco. Il 1 ° settembre 1942, l'esercito americano requisito l'intero resort - l'acquisto per 3,3 milioni dal suo proprietario, la ferrovia Chesapeake and Ohio - poi convertito in un 2.200 letto d'ospedale militare. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower era due volte un paziente lì. (E 'tornato per festeggiare un anniversario di matrimonio nel 1945.) Dopo la guerra, la strada-ferrovia comprato il back resort. Altri collegamenti governative seguì. Nel 1949, il segretario alla Difesa Louis Johnson incontrato alla Greenbrier con i Joint Chiefs of Staff, nonché ai segretari del, Army Air Force e Navy per quello che una storia del Greenbrier chiamato "top-secret discussione del dopoguerra strategia militare." Nel 1956 Eisenhower ha ospitato una conferenza internazionale lì con i leader di Canada e Messico. Operatori di hotel al momento ha risposto al telefono: "Buongiorno, Greenbrier Casa Bianca." L'hotel dispone di tre di collegamento "Eisenhower Parlors," e busto Ike è in mostra nel Salone del Nord.
    Ci sono stati anche frequenti visite del Congresso nel corso degli anni - nel 1980, i democratici del Congresso voluto incontrare lì - e gli alti funzionari provenienti da ogni amministrazione recente sono stati al villaggio. Una pubblicazione promozionale 1991 dispone di una foto di Greenbrier Presidente Kleisner accogliere il Segretario alla Difesa Richard Cheney.
    Nonostante i suoi legami governativi molti, c'è un tocco di ironia nella scelta del Greenbrier come ospite per una struttura costruita in risposta alla minaccia sovietica. Cyrus Eaton, l'uomo che ha presieduto la C & O - ora il conglomerato CSX - goduto di un rapporto intimo con la dirigenza sovietica. Soprannominato "del Cremlino capitalista preferito", ha preso l'orgoglio di aver ricevuto il Premio Lenin per la pace, e nel 1954 ha organizzato un incontro tra Stati Uniti e Unione Sovietica scienziati atomici nella speranza che intende mettere in guardia i loro rispettivi leader dei pericoli della corsa agli armamenti.
    "Quello che mi ha iniziato è stata la bomba atomica e la realizzazione che la nostra civiltà e la loro potrebbero essere spazzate via durante la notte", ha detto una volta.
    W gallina costruzione per l'impianto, è iniziata nel 1959, verso la fine della seconda amministrazione Eisenhower, la guerra fredda era al suo apice e la paura di un attacco nucleare sovietico è stato profondamente sia nella psiche dei comuni cittadini e nei pensieri dei pianificatori del Pentagono . Gli americani sono stati scavando indietro metri per rifugi, la memorizzazione lattine di zuppa Campbell sugli scaffali cantina e screening "duck-and-cover" film per bambini in età scolare. Nel frattempo, il governo è stato la costruzione di un certo numero di centri di trasferimento sulla costa orientale. La maggior parte sono state scavate delle montagne e divennero posti di comando alternativi per il presidente e il Governo, o centri di comunicazione (vedi box, pagina 14). E 'stato il periodo di massimo splendore dei pianificatori giorno del giudizio. "Continuità di Governo", come venne chiamato, si è evoluta in una sottospecialità militare. Vicino Berrille, in Virginia, Meteo Mount è stato scavato nella roccia e pieno di state-of-the-art apparecchiature di comunicazione, serbatoi sotterranei e le banche di computer. Un altro tale impianto era situato a Mountain Raven Rock in Pennsylvania vicino a Fort Ritchie.
    The Greenbrier era diverso in quanto essa si è basata più sul carattere di segretezza che su una montagna di roccia per proteggerlo dalle bombe in arrivo. Eppure, nonostante la discrezione del personale del villaggio, l'esistenza di un qualche tipo di installazione governo nascosto lì era molto conosciuto. Un ex funzionario del governo dice che gli è stato detto che così tante persone nella zona di White Sulphur Springs a conoscenza della struttura che il governo inviato due uomini che non erano stati informati in merito al progetto di mescolarsi con la gente del posto, in posa come cacciatori, di apprendere quanto molto è stato conosciuto e ciò che veniva detto. Secondo il funzionario, i due tornarono a Washington alcuni giorni dopo con così tanti dettagli circa la struttura che dovevano essere data top-secret.
    Centinaia di persone il sospetto che qualcosa di segretissimo si trova sotto il Greenbrier West Virginia Wing. "Ho sempre sentito le voci che esista una specie di bunker sotto il Greenbrier clinica", dice County Assessor Clyde Bowling. Come molti in questa piccola città di 2.800, si ricorda di essere stato detto che una società denominata Associates Forsythe operato il rifugio antiaereo, e che un uomo di nome "Fritz" Bugas corse Forsythe.
    Per molti altri, la struttura è tanto una questione di sospetto di una certezza. "Il governo ha ancora un impianto non, non c'è dubbio", dice John Bowling, ex sindaco di White Sulphur Springs. "E 'conoscenza comune qui." Giovanni Bowling dice che ha conosciuto per anni che la struttura è un centro di trasferimento del governo. La sua famiglia, a lungo nel business hardware, ha venduto molte delle parti che è andato nella costruzione della Virginia West Wing. Suo zio, Bowling dice, aveva una pista di pattinaggio vuota dove il governo memorizzato C-razioni prima di trasferirli al sito. Ricorda le pareti di cemento, due metri di spessore. "La profondità dello scavo è stato molto, molto impressionante", dice. "E 'stato fino in fondo lì".
    Al momento l'impianto era in costruzione, White Sulphur Springs, capo della polizia Bernard Morgan ricorda, gli è stato detto dal capo della sicurezza Greenbrier, il compianto Harry del Galles, che senza un nulla osta di sicurezza che non sarebbe stato permesso di entrare. Gerald A. Wylie, un ufficiale della sicurezza Greenbrier dal 1963 fino al 1980, dice che è stato in funzione, non vuole commentare ulteriormente, dice solo che "ti fa sentire al sicuro." Martha Dixon è la vedova di Arnold Dixon, che ha lavorato come ingegnere presso il Greenbrier. Ricorda il marito dicendole che doveva entrare la struttura periodicamente per verificare i generatori là. "E 'stato tutto doveva essere molto riservata," le disse. "E 'stato per quelli a Washington per venire qui."
    Un altro ex Greenbrier responsabile della sicurezza, che ha chiesto di non essere identificato, dice di aver visto letti a castello, bagno con doccia, una centrale elettrica interna e numerosi uffici dietro la porta protetta che conduce alla struttura. Ricorda anche di vedere un gran numero di casse di C-razioni. "Si potrebbe durare a lungo lì dentro," dice. "Se la guerra era scoppiata, abbiamo {} Greenbrier sicurezza avrebbe preso in carico." Un ufficio all'interno della struttura è stato designato per l'uso di agenti di sicurezza, dice.
    Non a caso, la maggior parte dei dirigenti attuali ed ex del Greenbrier di negare l'esistenza di qualsiasi struttura nascosta sotto il villaggio. La linea viene dal portavoce della società CSX James A. Searle Jr. a Richmond: "Non c'è rifugio antiaereo, nessun ente del governo vi posso dire quello che so è la verità e che è la fine di esso.».
    Chuck Ingalsbee stato direttore generale del Greenbrier da dicembre 1984 al febbraio 1987. Egli ora gestisce un resort dei Caraibi, sull'isola di Anguilla. Alla domanda circa l'esistenza di una struttura di governo classificate in Virginia West Wing, ha detto che avrebbe dovuto "toccare base con un paio di persone" prima che potesse rispondere. "Non voglio parlare con il problema fino a quando ho avuto una conversazione con le persone giuste", ha detto. "E 'stato un giuramento ufficiale ho dato." In una conversazione successiva, una settimana dopo, Ingalsbee detto che era stato diretto per non parlare della struttura.
    Truman Wright, ora in pensione e vivere in Highland Beach, in Florida, ha eseguito il Greenbrier dal 1951 fino al 1974, che coprono il periodo in cui è stato costruito l'impianto. "Non sapevo con certezza di tutto ciò che era in corso in esso", ricorda. "Ho volutamente non guardarci dentro." Wright riconosce sapendo che c'era una installazione governo locale. "Non immaginavo che era per gli ospiti dell'hotel," dice. Ma mentre "Avrei dovuto essere il più informati di chiunque altro ... tutto ciò che ha avuto luogo si è svolta a un livello molto più alto del mio, ad esempio, nel Palazzo Terminal Tower di Cleveland {poi C & O sede centrale}. Non lo so quello che succedeva. ho semplicemente lavorato per la ferrovia. "
    Durante la costruzione della Virginia West Wing, Wright ricorda, ha avuto una conversazione con un imprenditore su una stanza cavernosa su cui stava lavorando. "Si tratta di una sala espositiva?" osservato il contraente perplesso. "Abbiamo 110 orinatoi abbiamo appena installato. Che diavolo hai intenzione di esporre?"
    Wright dice di essere stato tenuto all'oscuro sui finanziamenti l'installazione pure. Ha detto di credere che un'altra fonte in cambio per consentire la possibilità di essere costruito a Greenbrier, il governo ha contribuito pagare per costruire il West Virginia Ala, Wright dice che è plausibile, ma non ha alcuna conoscenza di prima mano delle finanze ala nuova.
    F rom l'inizio, il centro di trasferimento Greenbrier è gestito dalla Forsythe Associates, una società apparentemente oscuro con sede a Arlington. In piedi al pronto per il funzionamento della struttura, il cui ingresso è a pochi passi da uno dei suoi uffici Greenbrier, Forsythe ha una copertina che mostra un genio per semplicità. La società ha sei o sette persone a tempo pieno con forza negano ogni coinvolgimento con il governo. Si dice che il loro compito è quello di riparazione e manutenzione del Greenbrier di quasi 1.000 apparecchi televisivi e di fornire l'hotel con servizio televisivo.
    E 'vero che Forsythe Associates' dipendenti TV di riparazione e fornire cavo di programmazione per gli ospiti dell'hotel. E può essere vero che alcuni dei dipendenti della società sa poco o nulla del sito classificato. Ma ci sono stati un sacco di segni che la società non è semplicemente quello che sembra essere.
    Il primo direttore generale di funzionamento Greenbrier Forsythe era John Londis, ora 76 e si ritirò a Boca Raton, in Florida Londis è un esperto di crittografia del segnale ex corpo d'armata che aveva un top-secret nulla osta di sicurezza ed era di stanza al Pentagono. Arrivò al Greenbrier nel 1960 come lavori per l'installazione è stato sempre in corso. Durante la crisi dei missili di Cuba nel 1962, secondo una ex funzionario del governo, Londis fatto un punto di lasciare il lavoro nei tempi previsti in modo da non attirare l'attenzione, ma poi tornò a l'impianto sotto la copertura delle tenebre. In una recente intervista, Londis negato di sapere di un impianto nascosto e ha detto il suo unico lavoro è stato quello di fornire un servizio televisivo per l'hotel.
    Una serie di chiamate recenti all'ufficio Forsythe in Arlington è stata accolta con questo disco: "Hai raggiunto Associates Forsythe Attualmente siamo in grado di venire al telefono Si prega di lasciare il vostro nome e il numero e vi richiameremo appena possibile.. ... bip ... bip ... bip ... Il nastro è pieno, si prega di chiamare di nuovo ". Una settimana dopo, il nastro è stato sostituito, ma nessuna chiamata sono stati mai restituiti.
    Forsythe mantiene un complesso di antenne, apparentemente utilizzati per fornire i programmi via cavo, in cima ad una montagna vicina. Un ex funzionario del governo che hanno visitato il sito dice che una delle antenne ha avuto un tubo-come sensore progettato per rilevare la luce emessa brillante in un lampo nucleare. Questo sensore, ha detto, attivare un allarme all'interno della struttura sotterranea. L'azienda dispone di almeno due uffici a Greenbrier, uno un negozio di manutenzione per i tecnici e le forniture, l'altro un edificio amministrativo in una zona raramente frequentata da ospiti del resort. La porta d'ingresso della sede amministrativa ha tre distinti meccanismi di bloccaggio - un tempo di Dayton-lock all'interno, e, all'esterno, una serratura Yale e una chiave magnetica-Blocco della carta. All'interno si trovano gli uffici di Paolo E. "Fritz" Bugas, che ha sostituito Giovanni Londis quando si ritirò nel 1976.
    Bugas è un uomo basso con un sale-e-pepe barba, un parrucchino scuro, occhiali spessi e una personalità in uscita. Un amico che ha chiesto di rimanere anonimo, dice che, come Londis, Bugas era un ufficiale di carriera nel Corpo d'Armata di segnale con un top-secret nulla osta di sicurezza. Il suo titolo è direttore orientale regionale di Forsythe, anche se i dipendenti Forsythe dice di non sapere di nessuna azienda Forsythe diverso da quello al Greenbrier. Sulla sua scrivania, dietro la targa, è una piccola bandiera americana con galloni d'oro. Sullo scaffale dietro la scrivania è una collezione eclettica di libri tra titoli come Robert Scheer con pale Enough: Reagan, Bush e la guerra nucleare e Stanley Karnow del Vietnam: Una storia. In una breve conversazione telefonica Bugas disse: "Io non ho remore a parlare con te." Ha promesso di richiamare, ma non ha mai fatto.
    Assistente Bugas è un uomo di nome John Nemcik, che dice di aver lavorato come operatore radio aeronautica e aveva un top-secret fino al suo ritiro nel 1958. Nel 1977, dice, è entrato in carica Greenbrier Forsythe dopo aver saputo di un posto vacante. Come ha imparato della vacanza non si ricorda. Prima di questo, dice, ha lavorato per una società dell'Ohio 1975-1977. Alla domanda su cosa ha fatto nei 17 anni tra il servizio militare e la posizione Ohio, dice, "ho rimbalzato in giro a lavori saltuari."
    Dall'altra parte del corridoio dall'ufficio Bugas è quella del suo segretario temporaneo, Childers Gladys. L'ufficio contiene un word processor, una stampante e, in un angolo, una alta velocità trituratore. Perché una società di riparazione TV bisogno di un trituratore? "E 'per sbarazzarsi di errori di Gladys," dice Nemcik con una risata.
    D escrizione della progettazione e realizzazione della struttura, ovviamente, sono scarse. Ma Randy Wickline, che ha trasportato concreta al sito, ricorda di aver visto il nome "Mosler" sulle porte enormi che sono stati installati agli ingressi.
    "Mosler" era Mosler sicura Co., un Ohio-based produttore famoso per le sue volte e cassaforte. Negli anni '50 e primi anni '60 aveva anche un fiorente "gruppo nucleare prodotti" che ha usato le competenze della società di costruzione di porte massicce per i centri di trasferimento del governo e bunker. La Società ha ritenuto le sue porte potrebbe sopravvivere l'impatto di una bomba atomica, o per lo meno una miss vicino. Una porta Mosler volta resistito un'esplosione nucleare circa due quinti di un miglio di distanza presso il governo Nevada Test Site nel 1957.
    Oder Chuck, ancora un ingegnere con Mosler, ha contribuito a costruire il perfetto a prova di porte per il Greenbrier. I suoi dischi di progetto di notare che ha ricevuto un ordine per quattro porte appositamente costruite nel febbraio 1960. La voce semplicemente leggere "Hotel Greenbrier". Ma con la giacca del progetto e gli archivi della società vi è una ricchezza di informazioni su Mosler contributo al progetto. Oltre le specifiche su una serie di progetti è scritto: "Greenbrier Hotel:. White Sulphur Springs ei suoi servizi aggiuntivi"
    Due delle quattro porte ordinato erano gigantesche, costruito per proteggere ingressi veicolari. Uno è stato designato "GH 1," l'altro ", GH 3." Con il suo telaio e assemblaggio, GH 1 pesava più di 28 tonnellate e misurava 12 piedi e 3 pollici di larghezza e 15 metri di altezza. La porta veicolare altro, GH 3, pesava più di 20 tonnellate. Le porte erano 19 1/2 pollici di spessore. Ciascuno è stato appeso con due cerniere. Tali cerniere pesava solo 1 1/2 tonnellate, secondo i documenti di Mosler. Ma le porte erano così delicato equilibrio che può essere aperto e chiuso con l'applicazione di soli 50 libbre di forza contro la loro massa. Due altre porte sono state costruite: un portello-come porta di misura 3 metri da 3 1/2 metri, e una "porta del personale" 7 metri di larghezza per 8 metri di altezza.
    Di solito, le porte più grandi sarebbe stato costruito con due pannelli, o "foglie", ma le porte erano Greenbrier "foglia unico." Singola foglia di costruzione massimizzato forza le porte ", eliminando la vulnerabilità causata da una cucitura. Istruzioni di ingegneria del tempo nota: "I dispositivi di blocco devono poter essere azionati soltanto dall'interno e devono essere protetti contro eventuali danni da azioni esplosione contro la superficie esterna delle porte." In linea con queste istruzioni, maniglie ruote grandi sono stati montati all'interno delle due porte più grandi.
    Posizionare la maniglia sul lato interno servito due funzioni. In primo luogo, ha consentito coloro che sono dentro la possibilità di chiudersi in contro coloro che altrimenti potrebbero tentare di entrare. La cosa più importante, in quanto la nota istruzioni, proteggeva il meccanismo di bloccaggio di una favola. Ruotando la manopola in un modo scivolò sugli giganti o rulli nei raccordi dietro il telaio. Girando la ruota nella direzione opposta rilasciato i perni. Non a caso, l'intero apparato somigliava il funzionamento di una cassetta di sicurezza - ma invece di scoraggiare ladri, è stato concepito per resistere ad un'esplosione atomica. Impatto iniziale Una bomba sarebbe teoricamente essere assorbita dalla porta, poi diffusa al telaio, infine alla parete di calcestruzzo versato intorno al telaio. La porta si piegava verso l'interno sotto lo sforzo, distorto e piegato. Poi veniva la pressione reazionaria dopo l'esplosione. La porta sarebbe rinculo - o, come dicono gli esperti, "rimbalzo" - sparare verso l'esterno. Senza i perni enormi per fissarlo, la porta potrebbe volare via dai cardini sul rimbalzo.
    Da Mosler di Hamilton, Ohio, pianta, le porte sono stati spostati in West Virginia con il treno. Erano troppo grande per essere posati su un carro merci ordinario, così hanno dovuto essere trasportati in piedi o in posizione inclinata, che richiede una macchina speciale piano che era abbastanza basso in modo che le porte si sarebbero chiaro gallerie e cavalletti sulla strada. Notazioni su progetti Mosler indicano che al momento dell'arrivo in Greenbrier, le porte d'acciaio dovevano essere riempiti di calcestruzzo. Mosler personale presso il cantiere installato le porte e loro telai.
    N ot essendo stato all'interno delle parti nascoste della struttura Greenbrier, non posso dipingere un esatto, up-to-date di foto di ciò che si trova al di là di quelle porte Mosler. Ma un ex funzionario del governo la cui familiarità con l'impianto risale alle sue origini offre una descrizione abbastanza completa, molti dettagli che sono confermate da fonti di stanza lì in anni più recenti.
    La sala più grande centro di trasferimento non è nascosto, ma è stato incorporato nel design del resort West Virginia Ala ed è conosciuta come "The Hall Exhibit". Di 89 da 186 metri sotto un soffitto quasi 20 metri di altezza e foderato con 18 colonne di supporto di massa, è una delle più importanti strutture per conferenze dell'hotel. Attraverso un ingresso veicolare, espositori può guidare camion carichi di attrezzature e display nella sala. General Motors 'alti dirigenti si sono incontrati qui in mezzo a esposizioni di vetture più recenti della società modello. Un opuscolo Greenbrier risalente ai primi del 1960 note, "Il pavimento è rifinito con un bel terrazzo di plastica progettato per sostenere il peso illimitato."
    Sia l'ingresso veicolare e un secondo, ingresso pedonale può essere chiusa da porte anti-esplosione con un preavviso molto breve. Eppure, gli ospiti non vedono altro che una camera spaziosa. In un pomeriggio recente, gli ospiti sono stati praticare la loro golf guida lì, colpire le palle in grandi gabbie fatte di reti, mentre fuori servizio dipendenti del villaggio jogging lungo il perimetro. I bambini giocavano shuffleboard lungo la parete nord.
    Nella parte posteriore del Exhibit Hall sono due sale più piccole anche a disposizione degli ospiti. Le sedi più grandi di questi circa 470 - abbastanza per ospitare il 435-membro della Camera dei Rappresentanti. Velluto a coste verde sedie rivestite con braccioli che aumentano fino a diventare banchi sono bloccati in righe. Un tappeto rosso conduce al palco. La più piccola delle sale ha una capienza di circa 130, sufficiente a servire come camera temporanea Senato. La Hall Exhibit stesso potrebbe essere utilizzato per sessioni congiunte del Congresso.
    Tutto questo è stato aperto e disponibile a centinaia di migliaia di ignari clienti che sono passati attraverso per più di tre decenni. Ma il resto dell'impianto è fuori vista pubblica.
    Non lontano dalle sale è un grande porta bianca con quattro bulloni di metallo, due serratura nel pavimento e due nel soffitto. Essa conduce ad un corridoio, forse 20 metri di lunghezza, che termina in una porta chiusa a chiave, dove un cartello con lettere rosse contro uno sfondo bianco mette in guardia: "Pericolo:. High Voltage Keep Out" Overhead sono un grande sistema di illuminazione di emergenza, prese d'aria e quelli che sembrano essere i sensori. Poche persone sono state al di là di questa porta, che può essere aperto solo con un permesso speciale chiave.
    Quando l'ex funzionario del governo entrato nella struttura, è stato sorpreso da ciò che ha visto. Lungo il lato sinistro del largo corridoio che porta ulteriormente sul fianco della collina era un infermeria completa con un tavolo operatorio, poi un dormitorio con centinaia di letti a castello di metallo. I materassi erano coperti, ma i letti non sono state fatte. Accanto al dormitorio era una camera con doccia, completo di barre di sapone avvolto nei piatti. "Mi ricordo la prima volta che l'ho visto, in particolare il dormitorio," dice l'ex funzionario. "Ho avuto brutti sogni la notte. E 'una di quelle esperienze che non si dimenticano con leggerezza.' Spaventato l'inferno fuori di me".
    Al di là di quella stanza era uno studio televisivo dal quale i legislatori sarebbe in grado di affrontare ciò che era rimasto della nazione. Ancora più nel composto era una radio e una sala di comunicazione, una camera con cabine telefoniche che era stata insonorizzate e dotate di macchine crittografiche. A destra del corridoio, come quello inserito la porta era una sala da pranzo dove un certo numero di coperti erano stati ordinatamente disposti. Le pareti della sala da pranzo caratterizzato false finestre complete di cornici in legno e scene di campagna dipinte su di loro. L'idea, a quanto pare, era che l'illusione di essere al di sopra del suolo potrebbe contrastare il senso di sepoltura che potrebbe venire da un soggiorno prolungato nella struttura.
    C'era anche una cucina e una zona di stoccaggio. Nel molto posteriore del composto era una camera di alimentazione, con due generatori diesel, in piedi a due piani, pronti a fornire tutte le esigenze elettriche. Nella stessa stanza era un dispositivo identificato come un "inceneritore di rifiuti patologico" (traduzione: un forno per le cremazioni). Una volta che le porte sono state sigillate esplosione, nessuno poteva entrare o uscire fino a quando la crisi era passata. Sepoltura o altra cessione di corpi sarebbe impossibile, l'ex funzionario è stato detto.
    Oltre l'installazione, un tunnel veicolare condotto attraverso la collina e verso il retro della proprietà Greenbrier, invisibile dalla strada, ma comodo sia Route 60 e una linea ferroviaria. Forniture per l'impianto entrava questo tunnel, di solito di notte.
    T ed Kleisner, presidente e amministratore delegato del Greenbrier, è una padrona. Foto in depliant dell'hotel mostrargli raggiante con i suoi ospiti celebrità. Ma ci si può aspettare di accogliere domande su un governo di installazione nascosta all'interno del suo villaggio.
    "Come potrebbe andare avanti senza il mio coinvolgimento totale?" dice mentre si prepara a volare a Vancouver per prendere un American Automobile Association Five Diamond Award, l'onore ennesima del resort per eccellenza. "Non è possibile. Corro tutto ciò che è qui al Greenbrier .... Il nostro unico ruolo è quello di servire gli ospiti."
    Consente Kleisner di accompagnarmi al Virginia West Wing per dimostrare una volta per tutte che non c'è luogo segreto sulla proprietà. Dal suo ufficio si trova a 10 minuti a piedi attraverso un salone sontuoso dopo l'altro, e, infine, lungo un lungo corridoio di collegamento rigido che ricorda un corridoio del Pentagono. Sul modo in cui respinge la storia che sto segnalato come "bizzarro", "fantastico" e del tutto falso.
    Mentre ci avviciniamo al Exhibit Hall faccio notare un muro finto dietro il quale si nasconde una delle porte anti-esplosione. Cinque cerniere in acciaio di grandi dimensioni sporgono dal muro. Lui ride e dice che sto guardando "un giunto di dilatazione" che collega i due edifici.
    Facciamo nostro viaggio verso la parte posteriore della 470-auditorium. Immaginare la Camera dei Rappresentanti in seduta qui, le porte esterne che le Exhibit Hall sigillata dietro tonnellate di acciaio e cemento, cerco di evocare l'ordine del giorno: Retaliation? Ricostruire la nazione? Interrompe Kleisner mie fantasticherie inquietante notare che questo è dove i figli dei dipendenti guardare i cartoni animati a Natale.
    Infine ci troviamo a pochi metri dalla porta che conduce direttamente alla parte nascosta della struttura delocalizzazione. E 'l'unica porta chiusa ho chiesto di passare attraverso. Kleisner si rifiuta di aprirlo. "In realtà che va a un settore attrezzature e noi non c'è bisogno di tornare là", spiega. Più tardi gli chiedo ancora una volta perché non ho potuto entrare nella porta. "Perché ti ho detto 'no'", dice con fermezza.
    Mentre si prepara a partire per Vancouver, il suo tono si ammorbidisce. La nazione "dovrebbe avere una struttura come quello che dici che abbiamo qui", dice. "Dovremmo avere un sacco di strutture per proteggerci in caso Muammar Gheddafi decide di buttare un paio sulla nostra prua." Beh, mi chiedo, perché non al Greenbrier? "E 'chiaro che non sarebbe compatibile con la località di destinazione", dice.
    Quindi, nel caso in cui le sue ripetute smentite hanno perso il loro marchio, invoca l'assurdo. "Pensi davvero che se ci fosse imminente guerra nucleare globale che il Congresso sarebbe sorseggiando tè e ascoltando concerti al Greenbrier?"
    W uando si tratta di l'utilità della struttura Greenbrier, Kleisner questione potrebbe essere pericolosamente vicino al marchio.
    Proprio come il Congresso avrebbe dovuto raggiungere il Greenbrier è chiaro. Si tratta di almeno cinque ore di macchina dal Campidoglio. Nella primavera del 1962, così come la struttura è diventata operativa, il C & O e il Greenbrier pagato circa $ 90.000 e avere la pista vicina Greenbrier Valley Airport esteso, secondo una brochure promozionale del tempo. Oggi questo aeroporto ha una pista di 7.000 metri in grado di gestire un aereo di linea commerciale. Ma è ancora un'ora di volo da Washington. E poiché pochi membri del Congresso sono stati consapevoli del fatto che l'impianto esiste, ci sarebbe voluto molto più tempo di quello per arrotondare in su.
    L'installazione aveva senso solo se i pianificatori previsti evacuare ore Congresso molti, se non di giorni, prima che una crisi si voltò dalla retorica per attaccare. Eppure, mobilitando 535 membri del Congresso e la loro evacuazione di una zona di villeggiatura 250 miglia di distanza nel mezzo di una crisi quasi certamente attirare l'attenzione indesiderata al sito.
    Un altro problema è che i membri del Congresso sarebbe vietato portare i loro coniuge e ai figli. Tip O'Neill ricorda che, in qualità di relatore, ha ricevuto un briefing annuale sulla struttura, ma dice che non ha prestato molta attenzione ad esso. "Mi sono perso interesse in essa, quando mi hanno detto che mia moglie non sarebbe andato con me", dice O'Neill. "Ho detto: 'Gesù, non pensi che ho intenzione di scappare e lasciare mia moglie? Questa è la cosa più pazza che io abbia mai sentito.' "O'Neill preoccupazioni sono state più volte ripreso da segretari di Gabinetto e altri alti funzionari durante le esercitazioni simulate presso i centri di trasferimento di altri. Solo pochi hanno espresso la volontà di lasciare Washington - Ground Zero a quasi ogni scenario di attacco - senza le loro famiglie.
    Tutti questi fattori hanno reso l'utilità della struttura Greenbrier discutibile dall'inizio. Nei decenni successivi è stato concepito e realizzato, il numero delle armi nucleari è notevolmente moltiplicato e la loro accuratezza è stata notevolmente migliorata. E il tempo trascorso dal lancio impatto potrebbe essere inferiore a 15 minuti. "Non ho mai messo molto credito in esso, a dire la verità", dice O'Neill. "Io non pensavo che avrebbe funzionato."
    Nessun esodo dal Congresso sia mai stato tentato, in modo che la praticità del piano di delocalizzazione non è mai stata messa alla prova. In almeno un'occasione, però - durante la crisi dei missili di Cuba - l'impianto è stato messo Greenbrier in allerta. Un ex funzionario ricorda essere stato detto di una serie di casse che arrivano al Greenbrier durante tale periodo, inviato da Washington per l'architetto del Campidoglio. All'interno, il funzionario è stato detto, erano manoscritti originali risalenti al 18 ° secolo, parte di uno sforzo apparente per disperdere documenti governativi critici in modo che essi non sarebbero stati tutti bruciati in una conflagrazione nucleare.
    Assurdità in scenari apocalittici è relativo, tuttavia, e il piano di Greenbrier sembra buono in confronto con i piani di trasferimento del governo per i comuni cittadini. Recentemente, nel giugno 1990, ad esempio, i pianificatori della difesa civile della nazione ancora designato Greenbrier County come il luogo in cui alcuni 45.500 abitanti della contea di Fairfax saranno evacuati in caso di una guerra nucleare, nel quadro di un piano generale di trasferire le popolazioni civili che vivono in principali aree di destinazione East Coast. Si tratta di un piano di ridicolo, come alcuni di quelli incaricato di sovrintendere liberamente riconoscere. "Si sarebbe in esecuzione dal nulla verso il nulla - per me, sarebbe panico assoluto", dice C. Kim Hallam Jr., una "protezione della popolazione ufficiale di pianificazione" con l'Ufficio West Virginia dei servizi di emergenza. "Ad essere onesti, di solito ho una fantasia piuttosto buona, ma se ho vissuto a Fairfax County, non riesco a vedere me stesso alla guida di cinque ore per un posto dove non ci sarà niente per aiutarmi una volta arrivati ​​lì."
    L'improvviso afflusso di persone sarebbe più del doppio della popolazione della contea. Non solo non c'è bunker vasto e ben fornito della metropolitana in attesa di prendere in, non c'è cibo o rifugio loro riservata a tutti. Invece ci si aspetterebbe di presentarsi con camper o tende e di portare il proprio cibo, medicine e materiali di consumo.
    "Si sarebbe situato sulle colline e vallate e pascoli," dice Rudy Holbrook, il coordinatore per la protezione civile Greenbrier County. "Sarebbe tendopoli".
    Ho 11 anni, al momento della crisi dei missili cubani. Ricordo credere che non sarebbe cresciuto fino a essere un uomo. Ricordo accovacciato sotto la mia scrivania a scuola e viene detto ad affacciarsi via dalla finestra, quando l'esplosione ha colpito. Ricordo anche i nerissimi titoli dei giornali che ogni giorno ci hanno suggerito avvicinando al precipizio, le foto sgranate con frecce che puntano a oggetti lunghi sui ponti delle navi sovietiche. Mi chiedevo perché fossi nato nella prima generazione che ha dovuto crescere all'ombra della bomba. Fin da bambino, forse soprattutto come un bambino, sembrava ingiusto.
    Più di 30 anni dopo che il complesso è stato scavato vicino al Greenbrier, cammino la collina che la nasconde e la ricerca di prove della struttura. I pini e querce che si sono radicati da allora sono ormai maturi. Il terreno è ammortizzata con aghi di pino in decomposizione, escrementi e cervi sono sparsi in tutto il mondo. Trovo un po 'di conforto in questo, il passare del tempo. Traggo un respiro più facile pensare che nel corso di tre decenni, tutto ciò che si trova sotto i miei piedi nel bunker vietata - tutti i piani terribili e preparati - è rimasta non necessari. Camminare questa terra come un uomo di 41 mi aiuta a fare i conti con quegli incubi infantili.
    Al vertice della collina, un verde e spettrale a forma di T ciminiera sorge dal terreno. Dietro un recinto, un grande punti antenna satellitare verso un cielo senza nuvole. Ho wend mia strada oltre la collina, attraverso boschetti impiglianti. Spine e rovi intoppo gambe pantaloni. Un gioco delle freccette lepre fuori da dietro un albero. Alla fine io vengo a una radura e una strada che conduce all'ingresso posteriore dell'impianto. So che dietro la facciata di metallo lucido, fiancheggiata da muri di cemento, è una delle porte anti-esplosione costruite da Mosler.
    E mi sembra che qui, davanti ai miei occhi, è l'architettura stessa della paura. Lezione segreto di The Greenbrier è la stessa mia generazione imparato così bene: come compartimenti stagni le nostre vite. Come contenere la nostra paura appena sotto la superficie, sicuro e controllato - quotidiano negarne l'esistenza -, mentre in superficie si curati i nostri prati, concentrata per il tempo libero e il consumo, e alzò la musica più forte come sarebbe andata. Così pure è stato con il Greenbrier. Per 30 anni, i suoi ospiti sono venuti a giocare a golf, da massaggiare, fare il bagno nelle acque di riparazione dei bagni minerali, mentre alcuni degli uomini che riparare i loro televisori e li hanno portati film fatto tutte le cose pronto per un mondo più scuro dopo questo mondo.Ted Gup è un corrispondente da Washington per il tempo. Il suo ultimo articolo per la rivista era latitante finanziere Tom Billman.

  4. #4
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier

    Ai giorni d'oggi l'hotel Greenbrier, ormai in declino, sta organizzando addirittura visite guidate in una parte del bunker, ma una parte del bunker resta tutt'oggi preclusa al pubblico e presumo sia la parte descritta in questo passo dell'articolo:

    Infine ci troviamo a pochi metri dalla porta che conduce direttamente alla parte nascosta della struttura delocalizzazione. E 'l'unica porta chiusa ho chiesto di passare attraverso. Kleisner si rifiuta di aprirlo. "In realtà che va a un settore attrezzature e noi non c'è bisogno di tornare là", spiega. Più tardi gli chiedo ancora una volta perché non ho potuto entrare nella porta. "Perché ti ho detto 'no'", dice con fermezza.

  5. #5
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier


    (PS: la seconda parte del video riguarda però un altro bunker tra le montagne di una riserva indiana)
    Ultima modifica di P 6; 13-02-13 alle 13:08

  6. #6
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier

    qualche altra immagine del bunker in questo altro video


  7. #7
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier

    Pochi sanno però che durante la II guerra "ospitò" (è proprio il caso di usare questo termine anche se il termine ufficiale è "internò") diplomatici e personalità soprattutto tedesche, che si dice rimasero nell'hotel anche dopo la dichiarazione di fine ostilità


  8. #8
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier

    un anno dopo quello di questo video, come citato nell'articolo
    nel 1949, il segretario alla Difesa Louis Johnson incontrato alla Greenbrier con i Joint Chiefs of Staff, nonché ai segretari del, Army Air Force e Navy per quello che una storia del Greenbrier chiamato "top-secret discussione del dopoguerra strategia militare."
    e si decisero le sorti del mondo

  9. #9
    P 6
    P 6 è offline
    X mod
    Data Registrazione
    05 Jul 2011
    Messaggi
    2,716
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Il bunker Greenbrier

    Altri uomini politici in visita al Greenbrier

    Gen. Eisenhower e-WV | Exhibit: Notable Visitors at The Greenbrier ? General Dwight D. Eisenhower



    Prime Minister Nehru of India stopped at The Greenbrier for a rest during an October 1949 U.S. Tour. He was hosted by Defense Secretary Louis Johnson, at right. In the center in the white hat is Walter Tuohy, the president of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, which owned The Greenbrier at the time.
    e-WV | Exhibit: Notable Visitors at The Greenbrier ? India's prime minister


    Kennedy alla riunione della potente associazione del tabacco
    Senator John F. Kennedy spoke to the U.S. Tobacco Association in June 1958. Kennedy had visited The Greenbrier 10 years earlier in 1948, and his parents, Joseph and Rose Kennedy, honeymooned at the resort in October 1914.


    Vice President Richard Nixon with Sam Snead in 1958; at left is The Greenbrier’s President Truman Wright and at right is Attorney General William P. Rodgers.



    Vice President Lyndon Johnson is greeted by Greenbrier President Truman Wright in May 1961. Although Johnson’s official reason for the visit was to speak to the Magazine Publishers Association, it seems probable that Johnson also toured the secret underground bunker, which was still under construction at the time.



    Henry Kissinger e-WV | Exhibit: Notable Visitors at The Greenbrier ? Jackson and Kissinger conferenza apr 1979


    e tanti altri uomini politici e d'affari

    chiaramente non solo un luogo di svago, ma un luogo di incontri di potere

 

 

Discussioni Simili

  1. Io, nel bunker con Hitler
    Di Tomás de Torquemada nel forum Storia
    Risposte: 3
    Ultimo Messaggio: 17-04-09, 15:14
  2. Das Bunker
    Di Der Wehrwolf nel forum Etnonazionalismo
    Risposte: 10
    Ultimo Messaggio: 27-06-06, 17:20
  3. Das Bunker
    Di Trevigi nel forum Destra Radicale
    Risposte: 3
    Ultimo Messaggio: 20-06-06, 11:46
  4. Torture, bunker e ogm
    Di Der Wehrwolf nel forum Etnonazionalismo
    Risposte: 0
    Ultimo Messaggio: 11-05-04, 17:19
  5. Kiuso Nel Mio Bunker
    Di AL SAHAF nel forum Fondoscala
    Risposte: 10
    Ultimo Messaggio: 03-03-04, 16:29

Permessi di Scrittura

  • Tu non puoi inviare nuove discussioni
  • Tu non puoi inviare risposte
  • Tu non puoi inviare allegati
  • Tu non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226