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  1. #1
    Simply...cat!
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    Predefinito Le conseguenze della massiccia immigrazione messicana in certi Stati degli USA

    Southwest shall secede
    from U.S., prof predicts
    By Frank Zoretich
    Tribune reporter

    Charles Truxillo, a professor of Chicano studies at the University of New Mexico, suggests "Republica del Norte" would be a good name for a new, sovereign Hispanic nation he foresees straddling the current border between the United States and Mexico.
    The Republic of the North -- he predicts its creation as "an inevitability" -- would include all of the present U.S. states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, plus southern Colorado."
    Stretching from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico, it would also include the northern tier of current Mexican states: Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas.

    Its capital would probably be Los Angeles.
    Truxillo, 47, has said the new country should be brought into being "by any means necessary."
    But in a recent interview at a coffee shop near the UNM campus, Truxillo said it was "unlikely" civil war would attend its birth.
    Instead, he said, the creation of the Republic of the North will be accomplished by political process, by the "electoral pressure" of the future majority Hispanic population throughout the region rather than by violence.
    "Not within the next 20 years but within 80 years," he said. "I may not live to see the Hispanic homeland, but by the end of the century my students' kids will live in it, sovereign and free."
    Truxillo said it's his task to help develop a "cadre of intellectuals" to begin thinking about the practicalities of how the Republic of the North can become a reality.
    In the past, of course, wars have erupted when states seceded from either parent nation -- including the U.S. Civil War to keep the South in the Union and, in Truxillo's quick description, "the Alamo and all that" when Texas declared itself independent of Mexico.
    Truxillo said the U.S. Civil War settled the question of secession militarily but not in a legal sense. States do have the right to secede, he maintained, if -- as was untrue in the 1860s -- the rest of the country is willing to let them go.
    Professors asked for comment in other departments at UNM were skeptical that politics alone would find a way to make his proposed new nation possible. But, they said, given 100 more years -- well, who can say for sure?
    "How realistic is it? That's one of the key issues," Truxillo said. "It's not unfeasible as a premise -- and a realistic possibility when you consider global geopolitical trends. It could happen with the support of the U.S. government."
    He listed a number of international developments that he said would have seemed "far-fetched in the 1950s," including the breakup of the Soviet Union, the breakup of Yugoslavia, the apparently imminent creation of an independent West Bank Palestinian state agreed to by Israel, and ballot-box separatist movements aimed at achieving a Quebec independent of Canada.
    The "tide of history" is moving the U.S.-Mexico border region toward political autonomy, Truxillo said.
    Why does he think there should be a new Hispanic republic?
    It's an idea that has been suggested before. In the 1960s, during the height of Chicano activism, something similar -- a sovereign Hispanic homeland to be called Aztlan -- was proposed by Rudolfo Gonzales and others.
    When Truxillo was 14, he first met Reies Lopez Tijerina, leader of a group of New Mexicans who seized the courthouse in Tierra Amarilla, the Rio Arriba county seat, in 1967. It was a protest against Spanish land grants being taken by the federal government and set aside for national forests.
    In October, Truxillo was a speaker during a ceremony at UNM's Zimmerman Library honoring Tijerina when he contributed his personal archives to the library's Center for Southwest Research.
    At the event attended by about 300 people, Truxillo said it was from Tijerina that he had learned "that I was a member of a people with a country that had been taken from them by war, a land that was our own by treaty."
    He listed a number of Spanish and Mexican treaties dating back to 1494 and ending with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, by which Mexico granted to the United States -- after the Mexican-American War -- possession of parts of what are now California, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.
    "None of the rights of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo were fulfilled," he told Tijerina. "None of the obligations were upheld. You told us this was our country, our patria, and that we should fight for our rights, that all colonized and exploited peoples should rise up in struggle for independence.
    "We will one day be a majority and reclaim our birthright by any means necessary -- and we shouldn't shy away."
    Truxillo's tone was more scholarly during the coffee-shop interview. He said New Mexico is the first "minority-majority state" in which Hispanics and Indians and other minorities on a national level outnumber non-Hispanic whites.
    (U.S. census estimates of New Mexico's 1998 population: 52 percent Hispanic, Indian, Black and Asian; 48 percent non-Hispanic white. The Hispanic population alone was estimated at 40.3 percent. The 2000 census is expected to provide more precise figures.)
    Texas is likely to become the next minority-majority state, Truxillo said, adding Hispanics are already in the majority in the border regions of all the Southwest states, largely because of a long and continuing immigration from Mexico.
    The "overwhelming bulk of Mexican immigrants are attracted by the American economic way of life," Truxillo said. "Not as attractive to them is the American cultural way of life, but they are willing to make the exchange of economic security for cultural anarchy."
    Hispanics in the American Southwest "have been ruled by three empires, Spain, Mexico and the United States," Truxillo said. "Under all three systems, we have failed to achieve self-determination.
    "Among native-born American Hispanics, there is the feeling that we are strangers in our own land," he continued. "We remain subordinated. We have a negative image of our own culture, created by the media. Self-loathing is a terrible form of oppression. The long history of oppression and subordination has to end. There has to be an alternative."
    Truxillo, who describes himself as a Chicano, said he was born in Albuquerque. He attended public schools in Albuquerque and earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from UNM, majoring in Latin American, borderlands and Asian history.
    He was an assistant professor of history at New Mexico Highlands University from 1992 to 1997, but after being denied tenure there, he began teaching in the Chicano Studies Program at UNM where he is now a visiting professor on a year-to-year contract.
    Truxillo said Hispanics who have achieved some positions of power or who are otherwise "enjoying the benefits of assimilation" are most likely to be in the vanguard of opposition to his concept of the Republic of the North.
    "There will be the negative reaction, the tortured response of someone who thinks, 'Give me a break. I just want to go to Wal-Mart.' But the idea will seep into their consciousness, and cause an internal crisis, a pain of conscience, an internal dialogue as they ask themselves: 'Who am I in this system?'"
    Along both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border "there is a growing fusion, a reviving of connections," Truxillo said. "Southwest Chicanos and Norteño Mexicanos are becoming one people again."


    Riassumendo,l'articolo (il primo) dice che a causa della massiccia immigrazione messicana(legale e illegale),entro 80 anni,in California,New Mexico,Texas,Arizona e Sud Colorado,la maggioranza della popolazione sara' ispanica e tenendo conto anche della differenza di lingua,visto che gli ispanici NON vogliono imparare l'inglese,un professore latino americano ha previsto la secessione dagli USA di questi Stati,per creare una "Repubblica del Nord" che comprendera' anche parti del Messico del Nord.
    Insomma una "bella prospettiva" per l'America,tutt'altro che fantasiosa e irrealizzabile,segno che il tanto decantato "melting pot" del quale le sinistre si riempiono la bocca non sta andando un granche' bene.
    E la futura Padania marocchino/pakistana/albanese dove andra' a finire invece?
    Chiedera' l'annessione all'Albania o al Marocco?

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  2. #2
    Ridendo castigo mores
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    Predefinito

    beh . i chicanos si riprenderebbero quello che era suo e da dove furono scacciati dagli yankees quando ancora facevano i bovari e tanti figli ...

    invece i nostri afroislamici non avranno questa giustificazione storica ... si prenderanno la padania solo ' in nome di allah grande e misericordioso' ...

  3. #3
    Forumista storico
    Data Registrazione
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    Predefinito Re: Le conseguenze della massiccia immigrazione messicana in certi Stati degli USA

    Originally posted by Dragonball
    Southwest shall secede
    from U.S., prof predicts
    By Frank Zoretich
    Tribune reporter

    Charles Truxillo, a professor of Chicano studies at the University of New Mexico, suggests "Republica del Norte" would be a good name for a new, sovereign Hispanic nation he foresees straddling the current border between the United States and Mexico.
    The Republic of the North -- he predicts its creation as "an inevitability" -- would include all of the present U.S. states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, plus southern Colorado."
    Stretching from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico, it would also include the northern tier of current Mexican states: Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas.

    Its capital would probably be Los Angeles.
    Truxillo, 47, has said the new country should be brought into being "by any means necessary."
    But in a recent interview at a coffee shop near the UNM campus, Truxillo said it was "unlikely" civil war would attend its birth.
    Instead, he said, the creation of the Republic of the North will be accomplished by political process, by the "electoral pressure" of the future majority Hispanic population throughout the region rather than by violence.
    "Not within the next 20 years but within 80 years," he said. "I may not live to see the Hispanic homeland, but by the end of the century my students' kids will live in it, sovereign and free."
    Truxillo said it's his task to help develop a "cadre of intellectuals" to begin thinking about the practicalities of how the Republic of the North can become a reality.
    In the past, of course, wars have erupted when states seceded from either parent nation -- including the U.S. Civil War to keep the South in the Union and, in Truxillo's quick description, "the Alamo and all that" when Texas declared itself independent of Mexico.
    Truxillo said the U.S. Civil War settled the question of secession militarily but not in a legal sense. States do have the right to secede, he maintained, if -- as was untrue in the 1860s -- the rest of the country is willing to let them go.
    Professors asked for comment in other departments at UNM were skeptical that politics alone would find a way to make his proposed new nation possible. But, they said, given 100 more years -- well, who can say for sure?
    "How realistic is it? That's one of the key issues," Truxillo said. "It's not unfeasible as a premise -- and a realistic possibility when you consider global geopolitical trends. It could happen with the support of the U.S. government."
    He listed a number of international developments that he said would have seemed "far-fetched in the 1950s," including the breakup of the Soviet Union, the breakup of Yugoslavia, the apparently imminent creation of an independent West Bank Palestinian state agreed to by Israel, and ballot-box separatist movements aimed at achieving a Quebec independent of Canada.
    The "tide of history" is moving the U.S.-Mexico border region toward political autonomy, Truxillo said.
    Why does he think there should be a new Hispanic republic?
    It's an idea that has been suggested before. In the 1960s, during the height of Chicano activism, something similar -- a sovereign Hispanic homeland to be called Aztlan -- was proposed by Rudolfo Gonzales and others.
    When Truxillo was 14, he first met Reies Lopez Tijerina, leader of a group of New Mexicans who seized the courthouse in Tierra Amarilla, the Rio Arriba county seat, in 1967. It was a protest against Spanish land grants being taken by the federal government and set aside for national forests.
    In October, Truxillo was a speaker during a ceremony at UNM's Zimmerman Library honoring Tijerina when he contributed his personal archives to the library's Center for Southwest Research.
    At the event attended by about 300 people, Truxillo said it was from Tijerina that he had learned "that I was a member of a people with a country that had been taken from them by war, a land that was our own by treaty."
    He listed a number of Spanish and Mexican treaties dating back to 1494 and ending with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, by which Mexico granted to the United States -- after the Mexican-American War -- possession of parts of what are now California, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.
    "None of the rights of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo were fulfilled," he told Tijerina. "None of the obligations were upheld. You told us this was our country, our patria, and that we should fight for our rights, that all colonized and exploited peoples should rise up in struggle for independence.
    "We will one day be a majority and reclaim our birthright by any means necessary -- and we shouldn't shy away."
    Truxillo's tone was more scholarly during the coffee-shop interview. He said New Mexico is the first "minority-majority state" in which Hispanics and Indians and other minorities on a national level outnumber non-Hispanic whites.
    (U.S. census estimates of New Mexico's 1998 population: 52 percent Hispanic, Indian, Black and Asian; 48 percent non-Hispanic white. The Hispanic population alone was estimated at 40.3 percent. The 2000 census is expected to provide more precise figures.)
    Texas is likely to become the next minority-majority state, Truxillo said, adding Hispanics are already in the majority in the border regions of all the Southwest states, largely because of a long and continuing immigration from Mexico.
    The "overwhelming bulk of Mexican immigrants are attracted by the American economic way of life," Truxillo said. "Not as attractive to them is the American cultural way of life, but they are willing to make the exchange of economic security for cultural anarchy."
    Hispanics in the American Southwest "have been ruled by three empires, Spain, Mexico and the United States," Truxillo said. "Under all three systems, we have failed to achieve self-determination.
    "Among native-born American Hispanics, there is the feeling that we are strangers in our own land," he continued. "We remain subordinated. We have a negative image of our own culture, created by the media. Self-loathing is a terrible form of oppression. The long history of oppression and subordination has to end. There has to be an alternative."
    Truxillo, who describes himself as a Chicano, said he was born in Albuquerque. He attended public schools in Albuquerque and earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from UNM, majoring in Latin American, borderlands and Asian history.
    He was an assistant professor of history at New Mexico Highlands University from 1992 to 1997, but after being denied tenure there, he began teaching in the Chicano Studies Program at UNM where he is now a visiting professor on a year-to-year contract.
    Truxillo said Hispanics who have achieved some positions of power or who are otherwise "enjoying the benefits of assimilation" are most likely to be in the vanguard of opposition to his concept of the Republic of the North.
    "There will be the negative reaction, the tortured response of someone who thinks, 'Give me a break. I just want to go to Wal-Mart.' But the idea will seep into their consciousness, and cause an internal crisis, a pain of conscience, an internal dialogue as they ask themselves: 'Who am I in this system?'"
    Along both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border "there is a growing fusion, a reviving of connections," Truxillo said. "Southwest Chicanos and Norteño Mexicanos are becoming one people again."


    Riassumendo,l'articolo (il primo) dice che a causa della massiccia immigrazione messicana(legale e illegale),entro 80 anni,in California,New Mexico,Texas,Arizona e Sud Colorado,la maggioranza della popolazione sara' ispanica e tenendo conto anche della differenza di lingua,visto che gli ispanici NON vogliono imparare l'inglese,un professore latino americano ha previsto la secessione dagli USA di questi Stati,per creare una "Repubblica del Nord" che comprendera' anche parti del Messico del Nord.
    Insomma una "bella prospettiva" per l'America,tutt'altro che fantasiosa e irrealizzabile,segno che il tanto decantato "melting pot" del quale le sinistre si riempiono la bocca non sta andando un granche' bene.
    E la futura Padania marocchino/pakistana/albanese dove andra' a finire invece?
    Chiedera' l'annessione all'Albania o al Marocco?


    Da quel che conosco, e provabilmente ne conosco una piu' del diavolo (Mr. Truxillo), i messicani non vogliono imparare l'inglese piu' per pigrizia e comodita' che per idealismo o motivazione politica. I latinos non provocano e non provocheranno nessun problema politico, almeno finche' l'economia USA sara' migliore di quella del Messico (e lo sara' per altri 100,200,300 anni almeno). Anzi, negli ultimi anni la situazione e' migliorata: fino a qualche anno addietro, il messicano che espatriava negli USA era visto un po' come un traditore, oggi e' visto come uno che ha fatto una scelta giusta andando a vivere meglio. Poi, specialmente qui in SoCal., quello dei messicani poveri e ignoranti e' solo un mito del passato. Infatti, anche se un latinos in media, guadagna meno di un WASP, guadagna sempre piu' della media di un itagliano!!!
    Diversa sara' la situazione in Europa, dove c'e' una immigrazione politicizzata e da parte di persone molto piu' ignoranti dei latinos, e senz'altro molto piu' mal intenzionati. Credo che riguardo a questo problema a Bossi dovrebbero fargli un monumento (e mi sa che qualche kilo di bronzo arrivera' anche dall'Olanda...).
    -N-

 

 

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