“Genetic analysis of a Sicilian population using 15 short tandem repeats” as printed in Human Biology, April 2003 by Calo, C M, Garofano, L, Mameli, A, Pizzamiglio, M, Vona, G http://www.findarticles.com/p/artic...304/ai_n9178664

“Further analysis shows within the same cluster a certain degree of affinity between Egypt and the populations of Sicily. The relationship between Sicilian and North African populations is controversial in population genetics (Piazza et al. 1988; Rickards et al. 1992; Rickards et al. 1998). Our data seem to confirm the hypothesis of Sandler et al. (1978) that underlines the African contribution to the Sicilian gene pool, because of the high frequencies of Hbs, cDe, and Fy (a-b-). In a paper on mtDNA, Semino et al. (1989) found support for this hypothesis, dating back to the introduction of black slaves by Phoenicians and Romans and to the later influxes of Arab immigrants.”
- Genetic analysis of a Sicilian population using 15 short tandem repeats
Human Biology, Apr 2003 by Calo, C M, Garofano, L, Mameli, A, Pizzamiglio, M, Vona, G
- http://www.findarticles.com/p/artic...i_n9178664/pg_2

“In addition, the boundaries found within the Palermo district have been stressed as a sort of economic boundary in a study focusing on surnames (Zei et al. 1993). The variability that has been found could be a consequence of the various dominations that Sicily has undergone: Sycanians, Siculi, and Elymians to begin with (Piazza et al. 1988), followed by Greeks, Romans, Normans, and Arabs (Sandier et al. 1978; Beretta et al. 1986). Among these, Arab domination seems to have had a very strong genetic impact.”
- Genetic analysis of a Sicilian population using 15 short tandem repeats
Human Biology, Apr 2003 by Calo, C M, Garofano, L, Mameli, A, Pizzamiglio, M, Vona, G
- http://www.findarticles.com/p/artic...i_n9178664/pg_2

The paper also confirms that there is a steep genetic divide bewteen North and South Italy:

“The peculiar and unexpected position of the Italian populations of Tuscany and Lombardy could be due to the presence of rare alleles, such as 28.2 and 29.2 for D21S11 in Lombardy and 13.2 and 14.2 for D18S51 in Tuscany, since high frequencies of these alleles occur in these populations. These populations appear strongly differentiated, even if compared with Sicily. A genetic boundary, in fact, clearly divides Sicily from north-central Italy and from northern European populations, besides the other populations from the western Mediterranean basin.”
- Genetic analysis of a Sicilian population using 15 short tandem repeats, Human Biology, Apr 2003 by Calo, C M, Garofano, L, Mameli, A, Pizzamiglio, M, Vona, G http://www.findarticles.com/p/artic...i_n9178664/pg_3

And another recent study:

“Y-chromosome 10 locus short tandem repeat haplotypes
in a population sample from Sicily Italy” by Maria Elena Ghiani, Giuseppe Vona (Department of Experimental Biology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy), Ignazio Stefano Piras, Robert John Mitchell (Department of Genetics and Human Variation, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic., Australia) , Legal Medicine xx (2004) xxx–xxx, Elsevier Publishing

Received 20 May 2003; received in revised form 25 October 2003; accepted 14 November 2003

Abstract
This study reports the first data on Y-chromosome-specific short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype frequencies, in the population of the island of Sicily (Italy), based on the combination of alleles at the following 10 Y-chromosome loci DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS439. In a total of 117 males, 108 unique haplotypes were observed, with 99 of them being singletons. The 10 locus haplotypes generated a diversity value of 0.9987 and discriminatory power (DP) of 92.30%. The data on the seven of the 10 polymorphisms (DYS19; DYS389I; DYS389II; DYS390; DYS391; DYS392 and DYS393) that have been most studied in worldwide populations were compared with similar data from neighboring Mediterranean populations in order to address the question of shared ancestry, gene flow and population affinities. Overall, results indicate Sicily is closest genetically to the mainland Italian population but also with evidence of a significant African component in the male gene pool. These findings are consistent with those obtained from other
genetic markers (autosomal and mitochondrial DNA as well as the classical blood groups) and also with the recorded settlement history (either peaceful or due to invasion) of the island.
2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Y-chromosome; Short tandem repeat polymorphism; Haplotypes; Population study; Sicily

Link to full report (PDF) http://home.ripway.com/2004-1/62802/sicily.pdf