User Tag List

Risultati da 1 a 7 di 7
  1. #1
    Forumista esperto
    Data Registrazione
    31 Mar 2009
    Messaggi
    13,969
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito il doppio standard della tolleranza

    carissimi vi posto una rassegna tratta da un giornale di studenti di stanford (in cui mi ritrvo abbastanza circa il pensiero conservatore... quello almeno che intendo io)

    Tolerance’s Double Standard
    by Jeremy L. England
    Guest Contributor


    Forward Article to a Friend
    Print Article

    Liberalism, through the values of tolerance that it espouses, has done immeasurable good for America during the last fifty years. Those of us who now gripe about or poke fun at the petty excesses of “political correctness” very likely never experienced (or else have forgotten) what it was like to live in a time when it was still acceptable in public to make gratuitous remarks that degraded and humiliated those of a particular gender, skin color, or religion. It is to our nation’s credit that social norms have changed so much in this regard over the last several decades, such that in many communities today, a bigot is much more likely to face ostracism than his victim.
    As the past several years have begun to teach us, however, not all the excesses of political correctness are petty and harmless. In their commendable effort to stamp out prejudices that are based on malicious and unfounded stereotypes, the champions of tolerance have gone overboard, and succeeded in fostering an atmosphere in which even thoughtful, critical generalizations about different cultural or religious groups are frequently denounced as racism. Hypersensitivity of this sort would be problematic in any context, but it is especially dangerous when it prevents our society from recognizing grave security threats and dealing with them in an effective way. There is no better example of this phenomenon than our reluctance to acknowledge the current state of affairs in the Islamic world, and the danger to us that it poses.
    I’ll start by saying something fairly uncontroversial: not long ago on the scale of human history, European societies were, by and large, backward, xenophobic, violently imperialistic, fervent in their religious intolerance, and plagued by twin dementias of misogyny and anti-Semitism. This generalization certainly glosses over many details of Europe’s rich and fascinating past, but it is nevertheless a true and informative statement that helps one get one’s bearings when trying to make sense of Western civilization.
    Equally true, but far more likely to attract accusations of racism and bigotry, is the following thesis: throughout its history, the Islamic world has, by and large, been xenophobic, violently imperialistic, fervent in its religious intolerance, and plagued by misogyny. More recently, it has additionally become backward and crazed with Jew-hatred. In thousands of mosques serving millions of congregants, imams incite the murder of Jews and gays and extol the virtue of perpetual war against America and Christianity. Countless Arabic television programs feature panel discussions on the finer points of beating your wife according to Islamic law, and fathers and brothers strangle their daughters and sisters because of transgressions of sexual honor. Even more disturbingly, many of these same things happen within immigrant communities in Europe and North America, which in some cases are even more radically anti-Western than parts of the Middle East.
    I am aware that much of what I have just written will seem shocking and upsetting to many readers, which is why I prefaced it with a little detour by the ugly side of European history. What we need to be asking ourselves is: why are we so willing to accept one of these generalizations, but not the other? Why should the West’s willingness to examine itself critically prevent it from pointing out extremely worrisome social and political trends in other parts of the world? And, most pointedly, how can the United States prevent future attacks on its citizens unless it recognizes how entrenched hatred of America and the West has become in the Arab and Muslim world, and how implacably so many people there work towards forcing a violent confrontation with the infidel enemy?
    These questions, and many others like them, should be the topic of constant, vigorous debate and discussion at our country’s top universities. Instead, few people are willing to ask them for fear of being castigated for their “Islamophobia” by enforcers who attack and discredit the “intolerant,” and by doing so wind up defending some of the most intolerant, hateful people on the planet. That is why I applaud the bravery of the students here at Stanford who recently sponsored a screening of the documentary Obsession: Radical Islam’s War against the West. I hope that their presentation of this controversial film, which documents the violence and hatefulness of burgeoning radicalism in the Muslim world, will spark the kind of discussion about history, religion, and the limits of tolerance that is so desperately needed on our own campus, and on many others around the country.

    Jeremy L. England is a second year graduate student in the physics PhD program here at Stanford. He graduated from Harvard in 2003 and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford.


    scusate l inglese ma è troppo lungo da tradurre... mi pare interessante per aprire un dibattito su un tema quanto mai attuale..

    •   Alt 

      TP Advertising

      advertising

       

  2. #2
    Forumista esperto
    Data Registrazione
    31 Mar 2009
    Messaggi
    13,969
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    mi dicono che non si riesce a rispondere al thread? come mai?

    ad ogni modo vedo molti accessi ma nessun commento, mi spiace che mi pare un tema di rilievo per discutere sul conservatorismo moderno.

  3. #3
    Rosso è bello
    Data Registrazione
    04 Mar 2002
    Messaggi
    4,464
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da *-RUDY-* Visualizza Messaggio
    mi dicono che non si riesce a rispondere al thread? come mai?
    In che senso non si riesce a rispondere?

  4. #4
    Forumista esperto
    Data Registrazione
    31 Mar 2009
    Messaggi
    13,969
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    non so ti linko direttimente cosa mi hanno riferito..

    non ho manco idea di cosa possa essere visto che non sono per nulla esperto di queste cose. http://politicaonline.net/forum/show...3&postcount=45

    grazie dell'attenzione

  5. #5
    Repubblica
    Ospite

    Predefinito

    .

  6. #6
    Leoni in guerra e agnelli pieni di dolcezza nelle nostre case
    Data Registrazione
    29 Mar 2009
    Messaggi
    15,424
    Inserzioni Blog
    8
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da *-RUDY-* Visualizza Messaggio
    carissimi vi posto una rassegna tratta da un giornale di studenti di stanford (in cui mi ritrvo abbastanza circa il pensiero conservatore... quello almeno che intendo io)

    Tolerance’s Double Standard
    by Jeremy L. England
    Guest Contributor


    Forward Article to a Friend
    Print Article

    Liberalism, through the values of tolerance that it espouses, has done immeasurable good for America during the last fifty years. Those of us who now gripe about or poke fun at the petty excesses of “political correctness” very likely never experienced (or else have forgotten) what it was like to live in a time when it was still acceptable in public to make gratuitous remarks that degraded and humiliated those of a particular gender, skin color, or religion. It is to our nation’s credit that social norms have changed so much in this regard over the last several decades, such that in many communities today, a bigot is much more likely to face ostracism than his victim.
    As the past several years have begun to teach us, however, not all the excesses of political correctness are petty and harmless. In their commendable effort to stamp out prejudices that are based on malicious and unfounded stereotypes, the champions of tolerance have gone overboard, and succeeded in fostering an atmosphere in which even thoughtful, critical generalizations about different cultural or religious groups are frequently denounced as racism. Hypersensitivity of this sort would be problematic in any context, but it is especially dangerous when it prevents our society from recognizing grave security threats and dealing with them in an effective way. There is no better example of this phenomenon than our reluctance to acknowledge the current state of affairs in the Islamic world, and the danger to us that it poses.
    I’ll start by saying something fairly uncontroversial: not long ago on the scale of human history, European societies were, by and large, backward, xenophobic, violently imperialistic, fervent in their religious intolerance, and plagued by twin dementias of misogyny and anti-Semitism. This generalization certainly glosses over many details of Europe’s rich and fascinating past, but it is nevertheless a true and informative statement that helps one get one’s bearings when trying to make sense of Western civilization.
    Equally true, but far more likely to attract accusations of racism and bigotry, is the following thesis: throughout its history, the Islamic world has, by and large, been xenophobic, violently imperialistic, fervent in its religious intolerance, and plagued by misogyny. More recently, it has additionally become backward and crazed with Jew-hatred. In thousands of mosques serving millions of congregants, imams incite the murder of Jews and gays and extol the virtue of perpetual war against America and Christianity. Countless Arabic television programs feature panel discussions on the finer points of beating your wife according to Islamic law, and fathers and brothers strangle their daughters and sisters because of transgressions of sexual honor. Even more disturbingly, many of these same things happen within immigrant communities in Europe and North America, which in some cases are even more radically anti-Western than parts of the Middle East.
    I am aware that much of what I have just written will seem shocking and upsetting to many readers, which is why I prefaced it with a little detour by the ugly side of European history. What we need to be asking ourselves is: why are we so willing to accept one of these generalizations, but not the other? Why should the West’s willingness to examine itself critically prevent it from pointing out extremely worrisome social and political trends in other parts of the world? And, most pointedly, how can the United States prevent future attacks on its citizens unless it recognizes how entrenched hatred of America and the West has become in the Arab and Muslim world, and how implacably so many people there work towards forcing a violent confrontation with the infidel enemy?
    These questions, and many others like them, should be the topic of constant, vigorous debate and discussion at our country’s top universities. Instead, few people are willing to ask them for fear of being castigated for their “Islamophobia” by enforcers who attack and discredit the “intolerant,” and by doing so wind up defending some of the most intolerant, hateful people on the planet. That is why I applaud the bravery of the students here at Stanford who recently sponsored a screening of the documentary Obsession: Radical Islam’s War against the West. I hope that their presentation of this controversial film, which documents the violence and hatefulness of burgeoning radicalism in the Muslim world, will spark the kind of discussion about history, religion, and the limits of tolerance that is so desperately needed on our own campus, and on many others around the country.

    Jeremy L. England is a second year graduate student in the physics PhD program here at Stanford. He graduated from Harvard in 2003 and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford.


    scusate l inglese ma è troppo lungo da tradurre... mi pare interessante per aprire un dibattito su un tema quanto mai attuale..
    il problema è che io e l'inglese abbiamo rotto in prima elementare
    Comunque funziona tutto regolarmente.
    www.interamala.it - Visitatelo che ci tengo

  7. #7
    Forumista esperto
    Data Registrazione
    31 Mar 2009
    Messaggi
    13,969
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    sì, deve esserci stato un qui pro quo...

    domani prometto che traduco i punti salienti ...
    ciao

 

 

Discussioni Simili

  1. Doppio standard evidente
    Di Mike Suburro nel forum Fondoscala
    Risposte: 3
    Ultimo Messaggio: 24-08-12, 12:12
  2. Il doppio standard del potere
    Di Marximiliano nel forum Politica Nazionale
    Risposte: 6
    Ultimo Messaggio: 04-01-10, 18:46
  3. Il doppio standard del politicamente corretto.
    Di Zdenek nel forum Politica Nazionale
    Risposte: 5
    Ultimo Messaggio: 22-08-06, 16:23
  4. Il vergognoso doppio standard dei filonazislamici
    Di Ashmael nel forum Politica Estera
    Risposte: 38
    Ultimo Messaggio: 12-08-06, 23:30
  5. Il doppio standard di Kofi Annan
    Di Jan Hus nel forum Politica Estera
    Risposte: 0
    Ultimo Messaggio: 15-03-02, 00:06

Permessi di Scrittura

  • Tu non puoi inviare nuove discussioni
  • Tu non puoi inviare risposte
  • Tu non puoi inviare allegati
  • Tu non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226