User Tag List

Pagina 1 di 5 12 ... UltimaUltima
Risultati da 1 a 10 di 48
  1. #1
    email non funzionante
    Data Registrazione
    07 Apr 2006
    Messaggi
    22,687
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Causa chiede il blocco dell'acceleratore del Cern: «può provocare l'apocalisse»

    http://www.ilsole24ore.com/art/SoleO...lesView=Libero
    Il Large Hadron Collider (Lhc), il più grande acceleratore di particelle al mondo in corso di completamento a Ginevra dal Cern, deve affrontare una minaccia inaspettata: è stato citato in giudizio in quanto «possibile causa di apocalisse e catastrofi cosmiche».
    Infatti, Walter L. Wagner e Luis Sancho, come riporta il sito del New York Times, il primo ricercatore sui raggi cosmici all'Università di Berkeley (California) e il secondo autore e ricercatore sulla teoria del tempo, hanno ottenuto dalla corte federale delle Hawaii una richiesta di rinvio dell'accensione dell'Lhc, fino a quando non verrà prodotta dal Cern documentazione sufficiente per poter dichiarare l'acceleratore sufficientemente sicuro. I due ricercatori ritengono infatti che l'Lhc sia sufficientemente potente da poter generare al suo interno un "micro-buco nero", capace eventualmente di inghiottire l'intera Terra se non addirittura tutto l'universo.

    Ovviamente, la richiesta di stop non è stata molto gradita dai responsabili del Cern di Ginevra. L'addetto stampa James Gillies ha infatti opinato che «una corte distrettuale alle Hawaii non dovrebbe avere il potere di bloccare una organizzazione intergovernativa europea come il Cern», sottolineando inoltre come «non ci sia nulla che faccia pensare che l'Lhc sia insicuro».
    Tuttavia, anche tra altri scienziati il parere non è concorde. Secondo la teoria delle stringhe, esistono infatti effettivamente delle possibilità che all'interno del Large Hadron Collider si crei un micro buco nero, ma su quanto può succedere "dopo", gli scienziati si dividono.
    Secondo il noto fisico Stephen Hawking, infatti, tali micro buchi neri sono destinati ad "evaporare" in brevissimo tempo, sviluppando unicamente una "nuvola" di radiazioni e particelle elementari, senza alcun danno pratico. Ma altri si riservano il privilegio del dubbio, come per esempio William Unruh dell'University of British Columbia, che fa notare come «la fisica potrebbe essere così bizzarra da non far evaporare i micro buchi neri. Ma deve essere -specifica Unruh- veramente bizzarra». Secco il commento di Michelangelo Mangano, fisico veronese al lavoro al Cern: «La possibilità che la terra sia inghiottita da un buco nero è troppo seria per essere trattata come pura stravaganza».

    Il progetto del Large Hadron Collider è nato 14 anni fa, ed è finora costato 8 miliardi di dollari. Il nuovo acceleratore avrebbe dovuto entrare in funzione già dalla fine dell'anno scorso, ma a causa di un problema tecnico verificatosi il 6 aprile 2007, l'avvio è stato spostato a maggio di quest'anno.


    •   Alt 

      TP Advertising

      advertising

       

  2. #2
    email non funzionante
    Data Registrazione
    07 Apr 2006
    Messaggi
    22,687
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Asking a Judge to Save the World, and Maybe a Whole Lot More


    By DENNIS OVERBYE
    Published: March 29, 2008
    More fighting in Iraq. Somalia in chaos. People in this country can’t afford their mortgages and in some places now they can’t even afford rice.
    None of this nor the rest of the grimness on the front page today will matter a bit, though, if two men pursuing a lawsuit in federal court in Hawaii turn out to be right. They think a giant particle accelerator that will begin smashing protons together outside Geneva this summer might produce a black hole or something else that will spell the end of the Earth — and maybe the universe.
    Scientists say that is very unlikely — though they have done some checking just to make sure.
    The world’s physicists have spent 14 years and $8 billion building the Large Hadron Collider, in which the colliding protons will recreate energies and conditions last seen a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang. Researchers will sift the debris from these primordial recreations for clues to the nature of mass and new forces and symmetries of nature.
    But Walter L. Wagner and Luis Sancho contend that scientists at the European Center for Nuclear Research, or CERN, have played down the chances that the collider could produce, among other horrors, a tiny black hole, which, they say, could eat the Earth. Or it could spit out something called a “strangelet” that would convert our planet to a shrunken dense dead lump of something called “strange matter.” Their suit also says CERN has failed to provide an environmental impact statement as required under the National Environmental Policy Act.
    Although it sounds bizarre, the case touches on a serious issue that has bothered scholars and scientists in recent years — namely how to estimate the risk of new groundbreaking experiments and who gets to decide whether or not to go ahead.
    The lawsuit, filed March 21 in Federal District Court, in Honolulu, seeks a temporary restraining order prohibiting CERN from proceeding with the accelerator until it has produced a safety report and an environmental assessment. It names the federal Department of Energy, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the National Science Foundation and CERN as defendants.
    According to a spokesman for the Justice Department, which is representing the Department of Energy, a scheduling meeting has been set for June 16.
    Why should CERN, an organization of European nations based in Switzerland, even show up in a Hawaiian courtroom?
    In an interview, Mr. Wagner said, “I don’t know if they’re going to show up.” CERN would have to voluntarily submit to the court’s jurisdiction, he said, adding that he and Mr. Sancho could have sued in France or Switzerland, but to save expenses they had added CERN to the docket here. He claimed that a restraining order on Fermilab and the Energy Department, which helps to supply and maintain the accelerator’s massive superconducting magnets, would shut down the project anyway.
    James Gillies, head of communications at CERN, said the laboratory as of yet had no comment on the suit. “It’s hard to see how a district court in Hawaii has jurisdiction over an intergovernmental organization in Europe,” Mr. Gillies said.
    “There is nothing new to suggest that the L.H.C. is unsafe,” he said, adding that its safety had been confirmed by two reports, with a third on the way, and would be the subject of a discussion during an open house at the lab on April 6.
    “Scientifically, we’re not hiding away,” he said.
    But Mr. Wagner is not mollified. “They’ve got a lot of propaganda saying it’s safe,” he said in an interview, “but basically it’s propaganda.”
    In an e-mail message, Mr. Wagner called the CERN safety review “fundamentally flawed” and said it had been initiated too late. The review process violates the European Commission’s standards for adhering to the “Precautionary Principle,” he wrote, “and has not been done by ‘arms length’ scientists.”
    Physicists in and out of CERN say a variety of studies, including an official CERN report in 2003, have concluded there is no problem. But just to be sure, last year the anonymous Safety Assessment Group was set up to do the review again.
    “The possibility that a black hole eats up the Earth is too serious a threat to leave it as a matter of argument among crackpots,” said Michelangelo Mangano, a CERN theorist who said he was part of the group. The others prefer to remain anonymous, Mr. Mangano said, for various reasons. Their report was due in January.
    This is not the first time around for Mr. Wagner. He filed similar suits in 1999 and 2000 to prevent the Brookhaven National Laboratory from operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. That suit was dismissed in 2001. The collider, which smashes together gold ions in the hopes of creating what is called a “quark-gluon plasma,” has been operating without incident since 2000.

    Mr. Wagner, who lives on the Big Island of Hawaii, studied physics and did cosmic ray research at the University of California, Berkeley, and received a doctorate in law from what is now known as the University of Northern California in Sacramento. He subsequently worked as a radiation safety officer for the Veterans Administration.


    Mr. Sancho, who describes himself as an author and researcher on time theory, lives in Spain, probably in Barcelona, Mr. Wagner said.
    Doomsday fears have a long, if not distinguished, pedigree in the history of physics. At Los Alamos before the first nuclear bomb was tested, Emil Konopinski was given the job of calculating whether or not the explosion would set the atmosphere on fire.
    The Large Hadron Collider is designed to fire up protons to energies of seven trillion electron volts before banging them together. Nothing, indeed, will happen in the CERN collider that does not happen 100,000 times a day from cosmic rays in the atmosphere, said Nima Arkani-Hamed, a particle theorist at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.
    What is different, physicists admit, is that the fragments from cosmic rays will go shooting harmlessly through the Earth at nearly the speed of light, but anything created when the beams meet head-on in the collider will be born at rest relative to the laboratory and so will stick around and thus could create havoc.
    The new worries are about black holes, which, according to some variants of string theory, could appear at the collider. That possibility, though a long shot, has been widely ballyhooed in many papers and popular articles in the last few years, but would they be dangerous?
    According to a paper by the cosmologist Stephen Hawking in 1974, they would rapidly evaporate in a poof of radiation and elementary particles, and thus pose no threat. No one, though, has seen a black hole evaporate.
    As a result, Mr. Wagner and Mr. Sancho contend in their complaint, black holes could really be stable, and a micro black hole created by the collider could grow, eventually swallowing the Earth.
    But William Unruh, of the University of British Columbia, whose paper exploring the limits of Dr. Hawking’s radiation process was referenced on Mr. Wagner’s Web site, said they had missed his point. “Maybe physics really is so weird as to not have black holes evaporate,” he said. “But it would really, really have to be weird.”
    Lisa Randall, a Harvard physicist whose work helped fuel the speculation about black holes at the collider, pointed out in a paper last year that black holes would probably not be produced at the collider after all, although other effects of so-called quantum gravity might appear.
    As part of the safety assessment report, Dr. Mangano and Steve Giddings of the University of California, Santa Barbara, have been working intensely for the last few months on a paper exploring all the possibilities of these fearsome black holes. They think there are no problems but are reluctant to talk about their findings until they have been peer reviewed, Dr. Mangano said.
    Dr. Arkani-Hamed said concerning worries about the death of the Earth or universe, “Neither has any merit.” He pointed out that because of the dice-throwing nature of quantum physics, there was some probability of almost anything happening. There is some minuscule probability, he said, “the Large Hadron Collider might make dragons that might eat us up.”

  3. #3
    email non funzionante
    Data Registrazione
    07 Apr 2006
    Messaggi
    22,687
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Ma son tutte cavolate?

  4. #4
    Forumista assiduo
    Data Registrazione
    21 Feb 2013
    Messaggi
    9,648
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da Kronos Visualizza Messaggio
    Ma son tutte cavolate?
    Ad occhio e croce direi di sì.

  5. #5
    Forumista assiduo
    Data Registrazione
    08 Oct 2012
    Messaggi
    8,720
    Mentioned
    39 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Purtroppo no. Il progetto in questione è nato nel tentativo di riprodurre su piccola scala la nascita dell'universo, per dare conferma alle varie teorie. Il problema è che nessuno sa' cosa possa accadere realmente. Gli scienziati stanno facendo passi da gigante, eppure ci sono alcune cose che rimangono oscure dell'universo.

  6. #6
    Forumista assiduo
    Data Registrazione
    21 Feb 2013
    Messaggi
    9,648
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da seven77 Visualizza Messaggio
    Purtroppo no.

    Ma via, la fisica è una cosa seria, non una puntata di star trek.

  7. #7
    email non funzionante
    Data Registrazione
    07 Apr 2006
    Messaggi
    22,687
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da Angelus Visualizza Messaggio
    Ma via, la fisica è una cosa seria, non una puntata di star trek.
    è qusto che mi preoccupa:
    Tuttavia, anche tra altri scienziati il parere non è concorde. Secondo la teoria delle stringhe, esistono infatti effettivamente delle possibilità che all'interno del Large Hadron Collider si crei un micro buco nero, ma su quanto può succedere "dopo", gli scienziati si dividono.
    bisognerebbe sapere chi sono questi "scienziati che non concordano". Se sono gli stessi che negano l'effetto sera poco male...

  8. #8
    .... .....
    Data Registrazione
    30 Mar 2009
    Località
    Nel tempo...
    Messaggi
    29,040
    Inserzioni Blog
    8
    Mentioned
    63 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Esistono due partiti tra gli scienziati..
    quelli che dicono non succede niente..e quelli che prospettano la possibilità di essere risucchiati dal buco nero..
    Ma la scienza non doveva dare certezze..?
    Allora è come la religione che si divide in tante sette..senza neanche dare la spiegazione di tutto..è un sapere limitato..ma confuso..
    armeggia..vede che succedono certi fenomeni..ma perchè accadano..e la loro natura..è mistero fitto..
    Forse la fiaba dell'apprendista stregone..andrebbe letta con più impegno..
    Bisogna dare all'uomo non ciò che desidera..ma ciò di cui ha bisogno...
    (la via diretta non è la più breve)

  9. #9
    Fiamma dell'Occidente
    Data Registrazione
    31 Mar 2009
    Località
    Nei cuori degli uomini liberi. ---------------------- Su POL dal 2005. Moderatore forum Liberalismo.
    Messaggi
    38,169
    Mentioned
    137 Post(s)
    Tagged
    48 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    C'è chi dice di averli già visti a Chicago i Microbuchi neri (Fermilab) e mi risulta che Chicago sia ancora dove era e che il suo acceleratore continui a funzionare come al solito.

    Detto questo:

    1) il tribunale non ha giurisdizione, si tratta di un giudice mattacchione che vuole notorietà

    2) è una cosa semplicemente ridicola.
    _
    P R I M O_M I N I S T R O_D I _P O L
    * * *

    Presidente di Progetto Liberale

  10. #10
    email non funzionante
    Data Registrazione
    14 Jul 2009
    Messaggi
    587
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da testadiprazzo Visualizza Messaggio
    Esistono due partiti tra gli scienziati..
    quelli che dicono non succede niente..e quelli che prospettano la possibilità di essere risucchiati dal buco nero..
    Ma la scienza non doveva dare certezze..?
    Allora è come la religione che si divide in tante sette..senza neanche dare la spiegazione di tutto..è un sapere limitato..ma confuso..
    armeggia..vede che succedono certi fenomeni..ma perchè accadano..e la loro natura..è mistero fitto..
    Forse la fiaba dell'apprendista stregone..andrebbe letta con più impegno..
    La scienza le certezze le da dopo le scoperte ; visto che le grandi scoperte sono avvenute per caso,ci potremmo ritrovare dentro un buco nero e sapere finalmente qualcosa di piu
    Sinceramente la cosa mi fa un po paura

 

 
Pagina 1 di 5 12 ... UltimaUltima

Discussioni Simili

  1. Risposte: 352
    Ultimo Messaggio: 11-10-11, 09:11
  2. Prodi è fuggito a causa del BLOCCO IDENTITARIO!
    Di Daniele (POL) nel forum Centrodestra Italiano
    Risposte: 14
    Ultimo Messaggio: 24-02-07, 15:38
  3. Nuovo acceleratore nucleare contro il canrco, la sfida dell'INFN
    Di Ronnie nel forum Scienza e Tecnologia
    Risposte: 0
    Ultimo Messaggio: 27-07-05, 19:50
  4. La vera causa del blocco non è di natura morale
    Di Affus nel forum Destra Radicale
    Risposte: 1
    Ultimo Messaggio: 01-10-03, 09:38
  5. 732 Ryanair causa il blocco x 3 ore di STN
    Di Oli nel forum Aviazione Civile
    Risposte: 1
    Ultimo Messaggio: 16-07-03, 18:51

Tag per Questa Discussione

Permessi di Scrittura

  • Tu non puoi inviare nuove discussioni
  • Tu non puoi inviare risposte
  • Tu non puoi inviare allegati
  • Tu non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226