User Tag List

Pagina 2 di 2 PrimaPrima 12
Risultati da 11 a 12 di 12
  1. #11
    Forum Admin
    Data Registrazione
    30 Mar 2009
    Messaggi
    25,381
     Likes dati
    0
     Like avuti
    7,393
    Mentioned
    1081 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    Inserzioni Blog
    5

    Predefinito Re: La battaglia culturale del politically correct

    qui c'è un altro articolo molto interessante sulla intolleranza verso la libertà di espressione altrui

    https://medium.com/@SeanBlanda/the-o...063#.k564f86rd

    The “Other Side” Is Not Dumb

    There’s a fun game I like to play in a group of trusted friends called “Controversial Opinion.” The rules are simple: Don’t talk about what was shared during Controversial Opinion afterward and you aren’t allowed to “argue” — only to ask questions about why that person feels that way. Opinions can range from “I think James Bond movies are overrated” to “I think Donald Trump would make a excellent president.”
    Usually, someone responds to an opinion with, “Oh my god! I had no idea you were one of those people!” Which is really another way of saying “I thought you were on my team!”
    In psychology, the idea that everyone is like us is called the “false-consensus bias.” This bias often manifests itself when we see TV ratings (“Who the hell are all these people that watch NCIS?”) or in politics (“Everyone I know is for stricter gun control! Who are these backwards rubes that disagree?!”) or polls (“Who are these people voting for Ben Carson?”).
    Online it means we can be blindsided by the opinions of our friends or, more broadly, America. Over time, this morphs into a subconscious belief that we and our friends are the sane ones and that there’s a crazy “Other Side” that must be laughed at — an Other Side that just doesn’t “get it,” and is clearly not as intelligent as “us.” But this holier-than-thou social media behavior is counterproductive, it’s self-aggrandizement at the cost of actual nuanced discourse and if we want to consider online discourse productive, we need to move past this.

    [IMG]https://cdn-images-2.medium.com/max/800/1*t8PO8ohDFLwgsxsvPr8dBQ.png[/IMG]
    [IMG]https://cdn-images-2.medium.com/max/800/1*t8PO8ohDFLwgsxsvPr8dBQ.png[/IMG]
    The Economist tracks what media is talking about vs. the habits of actual people.What is emerging is the worst kind of echo chamber, one where those inside are increasingly convinced that everyone shares their world view, that their ranks are growing when they aren’t. It’s like clockwork: an event happens and then your social media circle is shocked when a non-social media peer group public reacts to news in an unexpected way. They then mock the Other Side for being “out of touch” or “dumb.”
    Fredrik deBoer, one of my favorite writers around, touched on this in his Essay “Getting Past the Coalition of the Cool.” He writes:
    [The Internet] encourages people to collapse any distinction between their work life, their social life, and their political life. “Hey, that person who tweets about the TV shows I like also dislikes injustice,” which over time becomes “I can identify an ally by the TV shows they like.” The fact that you can mine a Rihanna video for political content becomes, in that vague internety way, the sense that people who don’t see political content in Rihanna’s music aren’t on your side.
    When someone communicates that they are not “on our side” our first reaction is to run away or dismiss them as stupid. To be sure, there are hateful, racist, people not worthy of the small amount of electricity it takes just one of your synapses to fire. I’m instead referencing those who actually believe in an opposing viewpoint of a complicated issue, and do so for genuine, considered reasons. Or at least, for reasons just as good as yours.
    [IMG]https://cdn-images-2.medium.com/max/800/1*csiyD7U9kJWUInGnHSWovw.png[/IMG]

    Source: Esquire/NBC News pollThis is not a “political correctness” issue. It’s a fundamental rejection of the possibility to consider that the people who don’t feel the same way you do might be right. It’s a preference to see the Other Side as a cardboard cut out, and not the complicated individual human beings that they actually are.
    What happens instead of genuine intellectual curiosity is the sharing of Slateor Onion or Fox News or Red State links. Sites that exist almost solely to produce content to be shared so friends can pat each other on the back and mock the Other Side. Look at the Other Side! So dumb and unable to see this the way I do!
    Sharing links that mock a caricature of the Other Side isn’t signaling that we’re somehow more informed. It signals that we’d rather be smug assholes than consider alternative views. It signals that we’d much rather show our friends that we’re like them, than try to understand those who are not.
    It’s impossible to consider yourself a curious person and participate in social media in this way. We cannot consider ourselves “empathetic” only to turn around and belittle those who don’t agree with us.
    On Twitter and Facebook this means we prioritize by sharing stuff that will garner approval of our peers over stuff that’s actually, you know, true. We share stuff that ignores wider realities, selectively shares information, or is just an outright falsehood. The misinformation is so rampant that the Washington Post stopped publishing its internet fact-checking columnbecause people didn’t seem to care if stuff was true.
    Where debunking an Internet fake once involved some research, it’s now often as simple as clicking around for an “about” or “disclaimer” page. And where a willingness to believe hoaxes once seemed to come from a place of honest ignorance or misunderstanding, that’s frequently no longer the case. Headlines like “Casey Anthony found dismembered in truck” go viral via old-fashioned schadenfreude — even hate.
    Institutional distrust is so high right now, and cognitive bias so strong always, that the people who fall for hoax news stories are frequently only interested in consuming information that conforms with their views — even when it’s demonstrably fake.
    The solution, as deBoer says, “You have to be willing to sacrifice your carefully curated social performance and be willing to work with people who are not like you.” In other words you have to recognize that the Other Side is made of actual people.



    But I’d like to go a step further. We should all enter every issue with the very real possibility that we might be wrong this time.
    Isn’t it possible that you, reader of Medium and Twitter power user, like me, suffer from this from time to time? Isn’t it possible that we’re not right about everything? That those who live in places not where you live, watch shows that you don’t watch, and read books that you don’t read, have opinions and belief systems just as valid as yours? That maybe you don’t see the entire picture?
    Think political correctness has gotten out of control? Follow the many great social activists on Twitter. Think America’s stance on guns is puzzling? Read the stories of the 31% of Americans that own a firearm. This is not to say the Other Side is “right” but that they likely have real reasons to feel that way. And only after understanding those reasons can a real discussion take place.

    [IMG]https://cdn-images-2.medium.com/max/800/1*P4eh08ddGc_lP8ip0nMpUA.jpeg[/IMG]

    SourceAs any debate club veteran knows, if you can’t make your opponent’s point for them, you don’t truly grasp the issue. We can bemoan political gridlock and a divisive media all we want. But we won’t truly progress as individuals until we make an honest effort to understand those that are not like us. And you won’t convince anyone to feel the way you do if you don’t respect their position and opinions.
    A dare for the next time you’re in discussion with someone you disagree with: Don’t try to “win.” Don’t try to “convince” anyone of your viewpoint. Don’t score points by mocking them to your peers. Instead try to “lose.” Hear them out. Ask them to convince you and mean it. No one is going to tell your environmentalist friends that you merely asked follow up questions after your brother made his pro-fracking case.
    Or, the next time you feel compelled to share a link on social media about current events, ask yourself why you are doing it. Is it because that link brings to light information you hadn’t considered? Or does it confirm your world view, reminding your circle of intellectual teammates that you’re not on the Other Side?
    I implore you to seek out your opposite. When you hear someone cite “facts” that don’t support your viewpoint don’t think “that can’t be true!” Instead consider, “Hm, maybe that person is right? I should look into this.”
    Because refusing to truly understand those who disagree with you is intellectual laziness and worse, is usually worse than what you’re accusing the Other Side of doing.


  2. #12
    Forum Admin
    Data Registrazione
    30 Mar 2009
    Messaggi
    25,381
     Likes dati
    0
     Like avuti
    7,393
    Mentioned
    1081 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    Inserzioni Blog
    5

    Predefinito Re: La battaglia culturale del politically correct

    la questione dei "basket of deplorables" è una questione di grande rilievo perché agita un vero conflitto profondo tra due visioni del mondo
    una "buonista" e una conservatrice
    i conservatori vengono dipinti dai media di regime come i cattivi, queste due puntate del Tucker Carlson show sono molto indicative ed interessanti




    Devi rassegnarti al fatto che le idee politiche che sono scese in piazza, sebbene sostenute ufficialmente da tante associazioni, in realtà sono idee di nicchia anche piuttosto radioattive politicamente adesso. Un partito che aspiri a vincere le elezioni adesso non potrebbe proprio sostenere ufficialmente queste posizioni. Non le osteggia in modo deciso impedendo che parte dei dirigenti del partito partecipino proprio per permettere che continui l'equivoco. Molti militanti sono stati fomentati con questi ideali fortemente intermediati da tutte queste associazioni (che si potrebbe dire che sono nate e fiorite grazie a questo modo di intendere la vita politica). Come uno strumento obsoleto, ma del quale il pd non ha al momento la forza di privarsi, se le tiene li, lasciando che il tutto sia ambiguo e indefinito. Ma non preoccupati a queste elezioni questa ambiguità sarà chiarita. Il pd sara colpito duramente su questo punto e dovrà prendere una posizione netta. L'immigrazione sarà un tema chiave di questa campagna elettorale. Un sacco di gente sposterà il proprio voto, ma non ti illudere non sarà la gente di sinistra (che in buona parte ormai si astiene) a spostarsi.
    CNN e MSNBC fanno un coverage negativo al 93% contro Trump. Forse nemmeno sotto Ceasescu c'era un allineamento così pesante
    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/by...rticle/2623641


    la caccia alle streghe e faziosità pazzesca


    in questo articolo qualcuno del NYT (sempre il più intelligente di questa nuova religione tribale buonista) ha capito che la situazione è critica e questo modo di fare è controproducente
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/18/o...rump.html?_r=0



    La questione in America è chiamata "virtue signaling", in sostanza personaggi famosi fanno campagne per promuovere piattaforme politiche o morali mostrando impegno sociale per dimostrare di non essere solo ricchi e famosi, ma anche umanamente migliori degli altri. Moralmente superiori insomma.

    Lo scopo di queste iniziative non è tanto raccogliere soldi per risolvere qualche problema in giro per il mondo. Quello è un fatto accidentale, nel caso succedesse davvero. E non è nemmeno il fatto di dare uno stipendio ai "professionisti del sociale" (come avrebbe detto Gaber), quello è un lavoro come un altro.
    L'essenza è tutta nel fornire, al mercato che ne fa richiesta (c'è gente che vuole pagare per questo) uno strumento, quanto più affine al proprio profilo culturale, per lavarsi la coscienza.
    Non c'è niente di nuovo.
    Millenni di storia documentata ce lo raccontano: quando c'era un raccolto o un gregge si sacrificava una parte del raccolto o del gregge al dio di turno per ingraziarselo e dire "so di essere stato fortunato e quindi per non apparire avido ti restituisco parte di ciò che ho avuto". Nei secoli si è visto con tutte le religioni lo stesso meccanismo, notevole il caso della compravendita delle "indulgenze" durante il Medioevo e oltre da parte della chiesa cattolica. Si potrebbe dire che tutto questo sia una questione di religione ma non è esattamente così:
    È lo stesso identico meccanismo che ci fa dare qualche fiches al croupier quando vinciamo una cifra alta alla roulette.
    Quale religione c'è dietro il rosso e il nero della roulette? Nessuna...
    e allora cosa?
    Un misto di superstizione e di senso di colpa verso qualcosa che sentiamo di non comprendere fino in fondo. Più probabilmente la percezione di essere stati fortunati e di non avere meritato quanto ottenuto a farci cercare una via di espiazione dal senso di colpa.
    Sulla base di questa richiesta di mercato molti ci vivono, altri fanno "virtue signaling", come i vip raccontati in questo video.



    qui c'è una altra riflessione interessante fatta nientedimeno che da Salemme contro il moralismo contro il fumo e contro la carne rossa, avrebbe potuto aggiungere contro i maschi eterosessuali
    Cita alcune battaglie liberticide di parte della sinistra degli ultimi 20 anni come la crociata contro il fumo e contro la carne rossa (non cita quella ancora più assurda contro la CO2 o quella contro la mascolinità e la natura maschile in se, si vede che voleva toccarla piano), ma soprattutto cita la questione dei sensi di colpa e paragona tutto alla religione. Sensi di colpa e espiazione (tra l'altro conseguita cercando di costringere altri a pagare per i propri sensi di colpa). Questa è nella realtà la piattaforma politica della autoproclamata "vera" sinistra attuale.


 

 
Pagina 2 di 2 PrimaPrima 12

Discussioni Simili

  1. Politically correct!!!
    Di MarinoBuia nel forum Politica Nazionale
    Risposte: 1
    Ultimo Messaggio: 29-05-16, 19:36
  2. Il politically correct...
    Di Hatshepsut nel forum Fondoscala
    Risposte: 104
    Ultimo Messaggio: 25-04-16, 19:28
  3. Risposte: 3
    Ultimo Messaggio: 05-10-14, 11:34
  4. Not too politically correct...
    Di Christine nel forum Americanismo
    Risposte: 22
    Ultimo Messaggio: 09-04-07, 00:09
  5. Politically Correct
    Di Il_Grigio nel forum Il Seggio Elettorale
    Risposte: 75
    Ultimo Messaggio: 07-10-06, 16:46

Permessi di Scrittura

  • Tu non puoi inviare nuove discussioni
  • Tu non puoi inviare risposte
  • Tu non puoi inviare allegati
  • Tu non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi
  •