User Tag List

Pagina 2 di 20 PrimaPrima 12312 ... UltimaUltima
Risultati da 11 a 20 di 198
Like Tree87Likes

Discussione: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

  1. #11
    Moderatore
    Data Registrazione
    05 Apr 2009
    Località
    Portovenere e La Spezia
    Messaggi
    44,277
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Inserzioni Blog
    1

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da dDuck Visualizza Messaggio
    il giappone ha densità si popolazione allucinante e costi degli immobili spropositati, per vivere in 20 metri quadrati me ne resto a casa.
    Uso l'acronimo di DUCK, dense urbanized conurbation countries.

    dDuck sta per raddoppio della D, very dense urbanized conurbation countries,


    ........ se non bestemmio oggi .......


    •   Alt 

      TP Advertising

      advertising

       

  2. #12
    email non funzionante
    Data Registrazione
    18 Feb 2015
    Messaggi
    4,795
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Inserzioni Blog
    1

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    https://newsliveupdates.com/bucking-...ivalently/amp/

    Bucking a Global Trend, Japan Seeks More Immigrants. Ambivalently.
    December 7, 2018 A


    KASHIWA, Japan — When it comes to immigration to Japan, Koichiro Goto is blunt. He’s against it.

    “To accept a lot of immigrants would break down the borders of our singular nation,” said Mr. Goto, director of a nursing home company in Kashiwa, a suburb of Tokyo.

    Yet Mr. Goto, who also serves on the local city council, supported a bill that passed Japan’s Parliament early Saturday, allowing for a sharp increase in the number of foreign workers who will be admitted to Japan starting next year.

    As immigration roils the politics of the West, and the United States and Europe seek to lock down their borders, Japan — long considered one of the most insular of nations — is moving in the other direction, surprising its neighbors and perhaps itself, by opening its doors just a bit wider to immigrants.

    Mr. Goto’s reasoning for endorsing the measure is purely economic: He is desperate to hire caregivers at Mother’s Garden, a 70-room nursing home where there is a waiting list of 60 would-be residents and want ads almost never attract job applicants.

    “If we aren’t helped by foreign workers,” Mr. Goto said, “this business would not survive.”

    Under the bill that passed Parliament’s upper house on Saturday, Japan will offer five-year work visas to unskilled guest workers for the first time. Between 260,000 and 345,000 will be made available, for workers in 14 sectors suffering from severe labor shortages, including caregiving, construction, agriculture and shipbuilding.

    The bill also creates a separate visa category for high-skilled workers, who will be allowed to stay for unlimited periods and enjoy greater benefits, including permission to bring their families to Japan.

    The new law appears to mark a significant turnaround for the right-leaning administration of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. As recently as three years ago, Mr. Abe said on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly that “there are many things that we should do before accepting immigrants.”

    To cope with labor shortages resulting from a declining population, he advocated for more women in the workplace, delaying retirement and using robots to do jobs once filled by humans.

    But Japan’s shrinking work force and rapidly aging population put pressure on Mr. Abe and his conservative supporters to accept that the nation’s demographic challenges could not be solved by internal measures alone.

    In the absence of immigration, Japan’s population is projected to shrink by about 16 million people — or nearly 13 percent — over the next 25 years, while the proportion of those over the age of 65 is expected to rise from a quarter of the population to more than a third. In caregiving alone, the government estimates that employers will need an additional 377,000 workers by 2025.

    The shortage of workers is “an urgent matter,” Mr. Abe said during a parliamentary session late last month. The country, he said, needs “foreign workers as soon as possible.”

    Yet the new law, which came under considerable criticism from opposition parties, does not represent an embrace of immigration so much as a deeply ambivalent business calculation. The bill, strongly pushed by industry groups, is vague in some aspects and is designed to limit the kinds of work that foreigners can do, as well as how long they can stay.

    “This isn’t about Japan becoming a multicultural society and it’s not about Japan opening its doors to become more globally oriented,” said Gabriele Vogt, a professor of Japanese politics and society at the University of Hamburg who has studied migration. “This is just very plain labor market politics.”

    Although the new law marks a shift in official policy, Japan has long accepted foreign workers through backdoor routes, such as visas granted to Brazilians and Peruvians of Japanese descent or technical programs for interns, mainly from China and Southeast Asia, purportedly so they can be trained in skills to take back to their home countries. As of October, there were nearly 1.3 million foreign workers in Japan, according to the government.

    Many employers use the trainees as cheap labor, and they often are abused. Between 2015 and 2017, the government reported that 63 foreign trainees had died from accidents or illness in Japan, with another six committing suicide.

    Critics fear the new law could simply extend the exploitation of foreign workers. “Without monitoring or an inspection system, the system won’t be managed properly,” said Chikako Kashiwazaki, a sociology professor at Keio University in Tokyo.

    In a sign of how deep suspicion of foreigners runs here, politicians from both the right and the left have questioned whether accepting more workers from abroad will disrupt society.

    “We need to secure jobs for old and middle-aged people, women and the youth who could not get jobs because of social withdrawal or depression,” Shigeharu Aoyama, a lawmaker from Mr. Abe’s governing Liberal Democratic Party, wrote in Ironna, a right-leaning online magazine. “We need to stop foreigners from using Japan’s social welfare system.”

    Addressing the House of Representatives late last month, Shiori Yamao, a lawmaker from the left-leaning Constitutional Democratic Party, the largest opposition group, warned that “if we open up the door without carefully designing the system, we will not be able to shut the door easily.”

    At Mother’s Garden, the nursing home in Kashiwa, where Christmas decorations blanketed the halls, Mr. Goto, the director, said he worried about cultural clashes between Japanese and incoming foreign workers.

    “I think it might be difficult for foreigners to understand” Japan’s spirit, he said.

    But Kanako Matsuo, the nursing home’s facilities director, said the handful of workers from Taiwan, the Philippines and Vietnam who already work there “have the same hearts” as their Japanese colleagues.

    “I don’t feel any gap in working with them,” Ms. Matsuo said.

    At lunchtime on Thursday, Ayuko Iwai, 29, a Japanese caregiver, spooned mashed chicken and soft-boiled rice into a resident’s mouth. A colleague was helping someone else, but five other residents sat listlessly in wheelchairs before a television. Soon it would be time for the colleague’s break, and Ms. Iwai would be left to supervise 10 residents on her own.

    “If we had more staff we could care for each patient more individually,” said Ms. Iwai.

    Some employers say foreigners may not want nursing home jobs. “If we don’t elevate the status of caregiving we won’t be able to recruit enough workers,” said Kaoru Sasaki, vice chairman of an association that represents 2,800 operators of group homes for elderly patients with dementia.

    The job can be grueling. At Mother’s Garden, caregivers bathe residents, change diapers and help them get dressed. They clean bathrooms and kitchens and take care of a pet rabbit. The average monthly pay after three years on the job is 200,000 yen (about $1,775, which works out to roughly $11 an hour).

    Lower-skilled foreign workers on temporary visas are unlikely to have much choice of jobs and won’t be allowed to bring their families. Analysts worry they will be treated as mere cogs.

    “It raises these much broader ethical questions that I don’t think the administration has thought through quite yet,” said Erin Chung, a professor of East Asian politics at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. “If anything, the administration might feel quite emboldened during the Trump era to enact policies that treat migrant workers and value them only for their labor without acknowledging their humanity.”

    Mr. Abe has emphasized the temporary nature of the visas. But analysts say the government needs to develop a longer-term immigration policy.

    Lully Miura, a lecturer on international politics at Tokyo University, predicted that China, which will also soon face a declining and aging population, would eventually start to recruit foreign workers as well. “So we have to create a proper system for foreign workers in order for them to stay and live and work happily in Japan,” she said.

    Local governments struggle to provide services for foreigners. Katsutoshi Murayama, an official at Kashiwa City Hall, said workers had to publish guidelines for emergency evacuations and trash disposal in several languages. He wondered whether newcomers would acclimate to Japan’s rules-based culture.

    “Our biggest worries are about whether they will be able to follow rules, like sorting the garbage,” he said.

    Such concerns are often cited by Japanese who fear an influx of foreigners. Michelle Fukai — who was born in the Philippines, moved to Japan for work 13 years ago and married a Japanese man — said her neighbors had recently asked her to explain to a new Pakistani neighbor how to sort his recycling.

    During a potluck lunch on Thursday at the Kashiwa Cross-Cultural Center, where a couple dozen foreign-born residents and Japanese volunteers shared homemade treats like pancit palabok, a Filipino noodle dish, Ms. Fukai said she hoped to become a caregiver at a local nursing home.

    “Japan,” she said, “needs to be rescued by foreign workers.”

    Originally posted by |
    Sparviero likes this.

  3. #13
    Forumista senior
    Data Registrazione
    19 Jan 2013
    Messaggi
    3,270
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da dedelind Visualizza Messaggio
    L'apertura all'immigrazione è fatta proprio per evitare il disfacimento visto che la società giapponese è sempre più vecchia e si fanno sempre meno figli
    amaryllide likes this.

  4. #14
    Forumista esperto
    Data Registrazione
    03 Apr 2009
    Messaggi
    14,059
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da nuovorizzonte Visualizza Messaggio


    L'apertura all'immigrazione è fatta proprio per evitare il disfacimento
    visto che la società giapponese è sempre più vecchia e si fanno sempre meno figli

    farebbero meglio ad adeguarsi costruendo un
    altro tipo di economia, con produzioni più selettive.

    non vedo perchè tutto l'universo mondo, dovrebbe
    considerare un pericolo la diminuzione della popolazione.

    ma dico, siamo condannati crescere in eterno?
    non esiste un ragionevole limite?
    Leviathan, Onofrio and Saburosakai like this.

  5. #15
    Disilluso cronico
    Data Registrazione
    25 Nov 2009
    Località
    All your base are belong to us
    Messaggi
    12,674
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    14 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da Maxadhego Visualizza Messaggio
    farebbero meglio ad adeguarsi costruendo un
    altro tipo di economia, con produzioni più selettive.

    non vedo perchè tutto l'universo mondo, dovrebbe
    considerare un pericolo la diminuzione della popolazione.

    ma dico, siamo condannati crescere in eterno?
    non esiste un ragionevole limite?
    L'unica maniera di supplire ad uno sviluppo verticale di crescita, è la trasformazione, altrimenti c'è il ristagno.
    Non vale però solo per l'economia: è l'intera società e cultura del Giappone ad essere in crisi, crisi di cui alcuni fattori simili stanno già colpendo il resto dei paesi di cultura occidentale. Una crisi di mancanza di valori, di individualismo esasperato combinato con una competitività sempre più accesa e spietata; una crisi che non potrà trovare una risposta interna perché la società nipponica non ha praticamente più nulla da dire o da dare, così com'è ora.
    In tutti i casi simili della storia, le conseguenze sono state il collasso od il cambiamento, ed entrambe hanno come forza motrice l'influenza esterna, che in un caso è soverchiante e nell'altro riattiva le energie prima disperse od ignorate. Il Giappone era a questo bivio quando le cannoniere dell'Ammiraglio Perry cambiarono il loro mondo, ora giunge ad una nuova crisi e le uniche risposte sono cambiare ancora o...
    amaryllide and ugobagna like this.
    .
    L'ultimo uomo ad essere entrato in Parlamento con intenzioni oneste.

    Non basta negare le idee degli altri per avere il diritto di dire "Io ho un'idea". (G. Guareschi)

  6. #16
    Forumista
    Data Registrazione
    11 Dec 2018
    Messaggi
    214
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.


  7. #17
    Forumista esperto
    Data Registrazione
    03 Apr 2009
    Messaggi
    14,059
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da Guy Fawkes Visualizza Messaggio

    L'unica maniera di supplire ad uno sviluppo verticale di crescita, è la trasformazione, altrimenti c'è il ristagno.
    Non vale però solo per l'economia: è l'intera società e cultura del Giappone ad essere in crisi, crisi di cui alcuni fattori simili stanno già colpendo il resto dei paesi di cultura occidentale. Una crisi di mancanza di valori, di individualismo esasperato combinato con una competitività sempre più accesa e spietata; una crisi che non potrà trovare una risposta interna perché la società nipponica non ha praticamente più nulla da dire o da dare, così com'è ora.
    In tutti i casi simili della storia, le conseguenze sono state il collasso od il cambiamento, ed entrambe hanno come forza motrice l'influenza esterna, che in un caso è soverchiante e nell'altro riattiva le energie prima disperse od ignorate. Il Giappone era a questo bivio quando le cannoniere dell'Ammiraglio Perry cambiarono il loro mondo, ora giunge ad una nuova crisi e le uniche risposte sono cambiare ancora o...

    indubbiamente è necessario affrontare un profondo
    cambiamento, che dovrà necessariamente passare
    attraverso la riscoperta di valori, che non sono propriamente
    quelli della borsa, ma della morale e dello spirito.

    il passaggio terreno di ogni persona è breve e tormentato;
    ma ci aspetta qualcosa di grandioso e di eterno,
    parola di Gesù Cristo che si immolato per il riscatto
    di tutti gli uomini.

  8. #18
    Forumista senior
    Data Registrazione
    15 Oct 2018
    Messaggi
    1,746
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Inserzioni Blog
    7

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da nuovorizzonte Visualizza Messaggio
    L'apertura all'immigrazione è fatta proprio per evitare il disfacimento visto che la società giapponese è sempre più vecchia e si fanno sempre meno figli
    Quindi secondo te il disfacimento della società giapponese lo si risolve facendo entrare una vagonata di immigrati senza arte nè parte?
    Saburosakai likes this.

  9. #19
    Moderatore
    Data Registrazione
    05 Apr 2009
    Località
    Portovenere e La Spezia
    Messaggi
    44,277
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Inserzioni Blog
    1

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da RigorMontis Visualizza Messaggio
    Quindi secondo te il disfacimento della società giapponese lo si risolve facendo entrare una vagonata di immigrati senza arte nè parte?
    Perchè secondo te l'immigrato non ha ne arte ne parte e il locale è speciualizzato in tutto ?
    amaryllide likes this.


    ........ se non bestemmio oggi .......


  10. #20
    Forumista
    Data Registrazione
    04 Dec 2018
    Messaggi
    226
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Predefinito Re: Giappone. Segni iniziali di disfacimento. Apertura alla immigrazione.

    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da RigorMontis Visualizza Messaggio
    Quindi secondo te il disfacimento della società giapponese lo si risolve facendo entrare una vagonata di immigrati senza arte nè parte?
    Credi che il Giappone accetti gente simile come l'Italia ?
    Questi 300k saranno selezionati e controllati prima dell'arrivo e probabilmente molti al termine del contratto saranno rimpatriati con una pacca sulla spalla.
    Maxadhego, Onofrio and Saburosakai like this.

 

 
Pagina 2 di 20 PrimaPrima 12312 ... UltimaUltima

Discussioni Simili

  1. Renzi- baricco. siamo alle comiche (iniziali)
    Di svicolone nel forum Politica Nazionale
    Risposte: 23
    Ultimo Messaggio: 17-02-14, 09:52
  2. Libia sull'orlo della guerra civile, nonostante speranze iniziali
    Di l'inquirente nel forum Politica Estera
    Risposte: 28
    Ultimo Messaggio: 10-01-12, 19:28
  3. Le migliori scene iniziali dei film
    Di Italiano nel forum Cinema, Radio e TV
    Risposte: 5
    Ultimo Messaggio: 17-08-11, 20:51
  4. Impressioni iniziali su Osho
    Di Chaos88 (POL) nel forum Filosofie e Religioni d'Oriente
    Risposte: 16
    Ultimo Messaggio: 17-11-06, 13:21
  5. Segni maggiori e segni minori
    Di Yggdrasill nel forum Destra Radicale
    Risposte: 11
    Ultimo Messaggio: 17-04-06, 01:25

Permessi di Scrittura

  • Tu non puoi inviare nuove discussioni
  • Tu non puoi inviare risposte
  • Tu non puoi inviare allegati
  • Tu non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225